Business

October 7, 2015
 

Signed, sealed, delivered: Lockheed Martin delivers first upgraded PAC-3 missile interceptors

The U.S. Army significantly upgraded its missile defense capabilities today as it accepted the first PAC-3 Missile Segment Enhancement interceptors built by Lockheed Martin.
With improved mobility and range, the new interceptors will defend against evolving threats around the globe.
“We are proud to deliver these interceptors to the U.S. Army and are confident the men and women of the armed forces can count on the PAC-3 MSE when it matters most,” said Scott Arnold, vice president of PAC-3 programs at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. “As enemy threats grow in number and complexity, these interceptors will be critical to protecting soldiers, citizens and infrastructure around the globe.”
The PAC-3 MSE missile is a high-velocity interceptor that defends against tactical ballistic missiles, cruise missiles and aircraft.
Building on the battle-proven PAC-3 missile, the PAC-3 MSE brings a larger, dual-pulse solid-rocket motor, larger control fins and upgraded support systems. With the enhancements, Lockheed Martin nearly doubled the missile’s reach and dramatically improved maneuverability against today’s faster and more sophisticated ballistic and cruise missiles threats.
Lockheed Martin received the first PAC-3 MSE production contract in April 2014 and earned a follow-on order in July 2015. For additional information, visit our PAC-3 and PAC-3 MSE webpages.




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