Space & Technology

January 8, 2016
 

NASA astronauts get advance look at CST-100 trainers

NASA astronauts Eric Boe (left) and Bob Behnken inspect the controls of Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner Crew Part Task Trainer as part of an early look at one of the systems that will prepare them for flight tests and missions.

Two of the four NASA astronauts training to fly Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft recently tried some of the systems that will prepare them for flights to the International Space Station.
During a visit to Boeing, astronauts Eric Boe and Bob Behnken focused on systems used for learning to manipulate switches and display panels. Flight controllers were also able to experience devices they will use to train for flight tests and missions.
“We have been learning about the spacecraft displays through slideshows. It’s great to finally see what we are actually going to train on,” Boe said. ”The trainers look great, and this visit gives us an opportunity to meet with the Boeing engineers. We appreciate them allowing us to give input on these trainers so the devices are ready when they arrive at Johnson Space Center.”
Behnken added that the training equipment is comprehensive.
“Historically, some trainers were just a simple component that might have a very specific task,” he said. “This one has a lot of capability with multiple tasks coming together so it can execute more complicated training scenarios.”
Two of the trainers are to be delivered to NASA in the autumn of 2016. Boeing is also building an immersive, high-fidelity training system that’s to be delivered in early 2017 to Houston’s Johnson Space Center.
The CST-100 Starliner’s first crew flight test to the space station is expected in 2017 and will be Boeing’s first commercial flight transporting humans to that destination. More information about the CST-100 can be found at www.Boeing.com/cst100.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines – September 17, 2018

News T-6 hypoxia problem solved, Air Force announces – The rash of hypoxia-like problems in the Air Force’s fleet of T-6 Texan II trainers was primarily caused by fluctuating concentrations of oxygen in the cockpit, the service said Sept. 13.   Military death benefits won’t be stopped by government shutdowns anymore – Military death gratuities...
 
 

News Briefs – September 17, 2018

Putin inspects war games billed as Russia’s biggest-ever Russian President Vladimir Putin inspected a week-long military exercise in eastern Siberia that involves around 300,000 troops and is being billed as Russia’s biggest-ever. Speaking at a firing range in the Chita region Sept. 13, Putin lauded the troops for their “high-level” performance and insisted the war...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Staff Sgt. Danielle Quilla

B-2s conduct hot-pit refueling at Wake Island

Air Force photograph by Staff Sgt. Danielle Quilla Crew chiefs and a fuel distribution operator deployed from Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo., conduct hot-pit refueling on a B-2 Spirit at Wake Island Airfield Sept. 14, 2018. Hot-p...