Business

May 24, 2017
 

Northrop Grumman demonstrates HAMMR multi-mission radar capability

NG-hammr
The U.S. Army selected Northrop Grumman Corporation’s (NYSE: NOC) Highly Adaptable Multi-Mission Radar to demonstrate its multi-mission capability at the 2017 counter-rocket, artillery and mortar test at Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz., earlier this year.

HAMMR is a multi-mission sensor that provides the war fighter with situational awareness, counter-fire operations, air defense, early warning and airspace management capabilities. During this test, the system successfully detected and identified Groups I and II unmanned aerial systems, providing real-time situational awareness to the operator. HAMMR also validated its ability to connect to the Army’s Forward Area Air Defense command and control system, which enables the communication of information from the system back to the force.

HAMMR incorporates an Active Electronically Scanned Array fighter radar mounted on a ground vehicle or towable trailer to provide continuous 360-degree protection against multiple ground and airborne targets — all while operating on-the-move so soldiers on the ground can maintain their operational pace without sacrificing protection. The modular self-contained system includes on-board prime power and cooling, AESA and radar electronics, and operator/maintainer display modules.  These modules support multiple packaging concepts, making HAMMR easily adaptable to multiple vehicle types, fixed installations and C2 interfaces.

 “HAMMR is the only AESA radar out there today that can support our maneuver forces’ on-the-move multi-mission operation,” said Roshan Roeder, vice president, mission solutions, Northrop Grumman. “Since HAMMR shares common hardware with our fighter aircraft radars, our customers realize the cost advantages of high-volume AESA production and benefit from the inherent reliability of this mature, proven technology.”




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