News

June 16, 2017
 

News Briefs – June 16, 2017

Missing USS Shiloh sailor found alive

The USS Shiloh (CG 67) sailor missing since June 8, has been found alive aboard the ship.
Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Mechanical) 3rd Class Peter Mims was found June 15, and will be transferred to the USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) for a medical evaluation. Following that evaluation a recommendation will be made for follow-on care.
U.S. Navy, Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force and Japan Coast Guard assets spent more than 50 hours in a comprehensive search that covered roughly 5,500 square miles of the Philippine Sea. The ocean search was suspended on midnight June 11, but the crew of the Shiloh continued their search on board the vessel.
“We are thankful to have found our missing shipmate and appreciate all the hard work of our Sailors and Japanese partners in searching for him,” said Rear Adm. Charles Williams, commander, Carrier Strike Group 5 and Task Force 70. “I am relieved that this sailor’s family will not be joining the ranks of Gold Star Families that have sacrificed so much for our country.”
The circumstances surrounding Petty Officer Mims’ disappearance are under investigation.
 

U.S. boosts team to investigate civilian deaths in Iraq, Syria

The U.S. military has more than doubled the size of the team that investigates reports of civilian casualties in strikes by the U.S.-led coalition in Iraq and Syria.
Independent and activist groups raised concerns about the growing number of civilians being killed in airstrikes, particularly as the fight has moved to heavily populated urban areas such as Mosul and Raqqa.
Army Col. Ryan Dillon, a military spokesman in Baghdad, says five full-time members are being added to the team, which to date included only two full-time and two part-time personnel. He says aviation, intelligence and legal experts were added, and will allow the team to act more quickly on civilian casualty reports.
The U.S. recently acknowledged that more than 100 civilians were killed in a bombing in Mosul in March. AP
 

U.S. allowed to investigate prices of Canada’s Bombardier jets

A government investigation will continue into whether Canada’s Bombardier is selling airliners in the U.S. at illegally subsidized prices, a claim that has raised trade tensions between the U.S. and Canada.
Chicago-based Boeing accuses Bombardier of violating antidumping and anti-subsidy laws by selling planes at below fair prices.
On June 9, the U.S. International Trade Commission voted 5-0 that there is enough evidence of harm to the U.S. aviation industry to let the Commerce Department go ahead with its investigation.
The Commerce Department is expected to have final decisions over the next four months. It could impose duties on Bombardier CSeries jets that hold 100 to 150 passengers.
Boeing argues that the new planes rely on illegal government subsidies, which allowed Bombardier to sell 75 jets to Atlanta-based Delta Air Lines at below-cost prices.
Bombardier said June 9 that it was confident Boeing’s claims will be rejected after more detailed review by U.S. officials.
Last month, Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland warned that Canada could cancel a planned $2 billion purchase of 18 Boeing military jets over the dispute.
Boeing said “trade only works if everyone plays by the same rules,” and it predicted that its business with Canada “will continue to thrive long after this commercial trade matter is resolved.” AP




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Headlines – June 28, 2017

News VA to open emergency rooms to ‘bad paper’ vets on July 5 – Veterans with other-than-honorable discharges will be able to access Veterans Affairs emergency rooms for urgent mental health care starting July 5, under new rules outlined by department leaders June 27.   Japan fitting F-35 fighters with advanced missile system brings it...
 
 

News Briefs – June 28, 2017

Pentagon: ‘active preparations’ by Syria for chemical attack The Pentagon on June 27 said it detected “active preparations” by Syria for a chemical weapons attack, giving weight to a White House statement hours earlier that the Syrian government would “pay a heavy price” if it carried out such an attack. A Pentagon spokesman, Navy Capt....
 
 
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Test team looks at new parachute for ACES II ejection seat

Air Force photograph by Brad White GR7000 parachute along with dummy descends over a drop zone near Edwards Air Force Base, Caif. A team from the 418th Flight Test Squadron conducted several drops using the parachute, which has...