Space & Technology

August 10, 2017
 

Northrop Grumman’s Astro Aerospace completes PDR for Inmarsat 6’s L-band reflectors

NG-satellite
CARPINTERIA, Calif. — Astro Aerospace, a Northrop Grumman business, completed a successful Preliminary Design Review of the nine meter L-band reflectors for two Airbus Inmarsat-6 series satellites.

The success of the PDR is a significant milestone for the Inmarsat-6 program. With the preliminary design of the L-band reflectors now set, Astro Aerospace will continue maturing the design in preparation for the Critical Design Review (CDR) later this year.

“We are proud to support Airbus Defence and Space and the Inmarsat program,” said John A. Alvarez, general manager, Astro Aerospace. “Astro Aerospace’s unique AstroMesh® technology is particularly well suited for Inmarsat-6’s L-band capacity, which is significantly greater than the capacity of previous satellites and capable of supporting a new generation of more advanced L-band services. AstroMesh® deployable mesh reflectors are made of the lightest and stiffest materials available, making them well suited for such missions.”

“I also want to thank the combined Astro-Airbus-Inmarsat team that worked tirelessly to ensure a successful PDR.”




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