Business

December 28, 2017
 

Gray Wolf: USAF awards Lockheed Martin $110 million for networked cruise missile

Gray Wolf will operate in highly contested environments, and will be capable of collaborative, networked “swarming” behaviors to address air-defense system threats.

Lockheed Martin has received a $110 million, five-year Phase 1 contract from the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory to develop and demonstrate a new low-cost cruise missile called Gray Wolf.

The Gray Wolf program seeks to develop low-cost, subsonic cruise missiles that use open architectures and modular design to allow for rapid prototyping and spiral growth capabilities. The AFRL is developing the missiles to feature networked, collaborative behaviors (swarming) to address Integrated Air Defense system threats around the world. The Gray Wolf missile design will allow for maximum mission flexibility.

“Lockheed Martin’s concept for the Gray Wolf missile will be an affordable, counter-IAD missile that will operate efficiently in highly contested environments,” said Hady Mourad, Advanced Missiles Program director for Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. “Using the capabilities envisioned for later spirals, our system is being designed to maximize modularity, allowing our customer to incorporate advanced technologies such as more lethal warheads or more fuel-efficient engines, when those systems become available.” 

The Gray Wolf program consists of four spiral-development phases that allow for rapid technology prototyping and multiple transition opportunities. This first phase, defined by an Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contract, is anticipated to run until late 2019. Initial demonstrations will be from an F-16 aircraft. In addition to the F-16, the system will be designed for compatibility with F-35, F-15, F-18, B-1, B-2 and B-52 aircraft.

“Our AFRL customer will benefit from decades of Lockheed Martin experience in building high-quality, low-cost systems like GMLRS, while capitalizing on the experience of our team in developing and integrating advanced cruise missiles such as JASSM and LRASM on military aircraft,” Mourad said.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Boeing’s 787-10 Dreamliner cleared for commercial service by FAA

Boeing announced Jan. 22 the 787-10 Dreamliner received an amended type certificate from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, clearing the airplane for commercial service. The awarding of ATC caps a successful flight test program that began in March 2017 and involved three flight test airplanes that accumulated about 900 test hours. Boeing’s flight test program...
 
 

Airbus could abandon A380 superjumbo amid lackluster sales

Airbus said Jan. 15 it will stop making the costly A380 superjumbo if it can’t strike a long-term deal with the airline Emirates for a steady supply of the planes. Abandoning the A380 would be a disappointing defeat for Airbus, which spent many years and many billions developing the double-decker behemoth, even as skeptics questioned...
 
 

Boeing, Adient launch new company to design, build airplane seats

Boeing and Adient announced Jan. 16 the formation of Adient Aerospace, a joint venture that will develop, manufacture and sell a portfolio of seating products to airlines and aircraft leasing companies. The seats will be available for installation on new airplanes and as retrofit configurations for aircraft produced by Boeing and other commercial airplane manufacturers....