Space

June 18, 2018
 

Record-setting NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson retires

nasa-retire
NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, who holds the U.S. record for most cumulative time in space, is retiring from the agency, effective June 15. 

“Peggy Whitson is a testament to the American spirit,” said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine. “Her determination, strength of mind, character, and dedication to science, exploration, and discovery are an inspiration to NASA and America. We owe her a great debt for her service and she will be missed. We thank her for her service to our agency and country.”

Whitson, a native of Beaconsfield, Iowa, first came to NASA in 1986 as a National Research Council Resident Research Associate at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. She served in a number of scientific roles, including project scientist for the Shuttle-Mir Program and co-chair of the U.S.-Russian Mission Science Working Group, before her selection to the astronaut corps in 1996. 

“It has been the utmost honor to have Peggy Whitson represent our entire NASA Flight Operations team,” said Brian Kelly, director of Flight Operations at Johnson. “She set the highest standards for human spaceflight operations, as well as being an outstanding role model for women and men in America and across the globe. Godspeed, Peg.”

As an astronaut, Whitson completed three long-duration missions to the International Space Station, setting records on each. She made her first trip in 2002 as part of Expedition 5, during which she took part in 21 science investigations and became NASA’s first space station science officer. In 2008, Whitson returned on Expedition 16 and became the first female commander of the space station.

During her most recent mission, spanning Expeditions 50, 51 and 52 from November 2016 to September 2017, Whitson became the first woman to command the space station twice (Expedition 51). She also claimed the title for most spacewalks by a woman — 10 spacewalks totaling 60 hours and 21 minutes — and set the record for most time spent in space by a U.S. astronaut at 665 days.

Whitson’s time on the ground at NASA was no less groundbreaking. She served as chief of the astronaut corps from 2009 to 2012, becoming both the first woman to hold the position and the first non-military astronaut corps chief.

“Peggy is a classmate and a friend, and she will be deeply missed,” said Pat Forrester, current chief of the Astronaut Office. “Along with her record setting career, she leaves behind a legacy of her passion for space.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
navy-queen-elizabeth2

Future USS Michael Monsoor, HMS Queen Elizabeth conduct PHOTOEX

Navy photograph by PO1 John Philip Wagner Jr. Capt. Scott M. Smith, commanding officer of Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) communicates with the British aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) via hand...
 
 
Lockheed Martin photograph

NASA’s Quiet Supersonic Technology project passes major milestone

Lockheed Martin photograph Illustration of the X-59 QueSST as it flies above NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in California. NASA has officially committed to a development timeline that will lead to the first fligh...
 
 

GA-ASI to provide RPAs to Australian Defence Force

General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. has been advised that, following consideration by the Australian Government, it has been selected to provide the Armed Remotely Piloted Aircraft System under Project Air 7003 for the Australian Defence Force. “We look forward to providing our world-leading RPAS to meet the Air 7003 requirements,” said Linden Blue, CEO of...