Veterans

August 20, 2018
 

Vets Briefs August 20

Remains of USS Oklahoma sailor from Indiana identified

Officials say the remains of a U.S. Navy sailor from Fort Wayne, Ind., who died during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor have been identified and will be buried Aug. 21 in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.
The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced Thursday that Navy Machinist’s Mate 1st Class Arthur Glenn was assigned to the USS Oklahoma, which was moored at Pearl Harbor when the ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft and capsized. The Dec. 7, 1941, attack occurred on Glenn’s 43rd birthday.
The attack resulted in the deaths of 429 crewmen aboard the Oklahoma.
The agency says Glenn’s remains were identified through DNA analysis, which matched his family, as well as dental and anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence. AP
 

Remains of Utah Marine killed in Pearl Harbor coming home

The remains of a Utah Marine who died during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor are finally coming home.
Marine Pfc. Robert Kimball Holmes was 19 years old when he died while serving aboard the USS Oklahoma on Dec. 7, 1941.
He died a day after he sent his a letter home to his father in Salt Lake City, his nephew, Bruce Holmes of Sandy, told the Salt Lake Tribune Aug. 16, as he tried to imagine his grandfather receiving that letter days or weeks after learning his son had perished.
“It must have just really rattled him after his son’s already dead,” Bruce Holmes said. “Gosh. That’d get ya.”
Nearly 77 years after his death, the Marine is finally returning to Salt Lake City thanks to a recent DNA match.
A casket carrying his remains was to arrive Aug. 17 night at the Salt Lake City International Airport. A military funeral for him will take place Aug. 20 at the Salt Lake City Cemetery.
Robert K. Holmes was the youngest of seven children. All of his siblings are dead.
His 83-year-old nephew and Bruce Holmes’ older brother, Robert J. Holmes, has childhood memories of the uncle he was named after.
He remembers his uncle as a man of strengthen and intensity.
“He had a look in his eye that ‘I’m a Holmes boy and also a Marine, so don’t mess with me,’ ” the nephew said.
He told the Deseret News that the family didn’t lose hope that their uncle’s remains would come home one day.
“I don’t know if you can really mourn somebody from 77 years ago,” he said. “But it’s been so exciting to the family to finally have Uncle Bob brought home.” AP




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
spaceA

Disabled veterans now eligible for Space-A travel

Air Force photograph The 2019 National Defense Authorization Act was recently signed, which included a measure that will allow fully-disabled veterans the ability to utilize Space-Available travel. Travelers should contact thei...
 
 

94 year-old vet receives World War II Medals after 72 years

A 94-year old World War II veteran received his long overdue medals during a ceremony at the Louisville Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in Louisville, Ky., Aug. 23, 2018. Rear Adm. Michael Jabaley, former Program Executive Officer for Submarines, awarded William Edward Gilbert, a Kentucky native, the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, World War II Victory Medal...
 
 
Courtesy photograph

One of last living World War II Marines

Courtesy photograph World War II veteran Sam Folsom flew the Grumman F4F Wildcat during his time of service in Guadalcanal in late 1942. His squadron, Marine Fighter Squadron 121, was the highest scoring Marine fighter squadron...