Space

August 27, 2018
 

U.S. Air Force’s first advanced GPS III satellite shipped for launch

Lockheed Martin shipped the U.S. Air Force’s first GPS III to Cape Canaveral, Fla., ahead of its expected December launch.

The first of the U.S. Air Force’s advanced new, higher-power, harder-to-jam GPS III satellites is making its way to the launch pad.

On August 20, Lockheed Martin shipped the U.S. Air Force’s first GPS III space vehicle (GPS III SV01) to Cape Canaveral for its expected launch in December. Designed and built at Lockheed Martin’s GPS III Processing Facility near Denver, the satellite was shipped from Buckley Air Force Base, Colo., to the Cape on a massive Air Force C-17 aircraft. 

GPS III will be the most powerful and resilient GPS satellite ever put on orbit. Developed with an entirely new design for U.S. and allied forces, it will have three times greater accuracy and up to eight times improved anti-jamming capabilities over the previous GPS II satellite design block, which makes up today’s GPS constellation.

GPS III also will be the first GPS satellite to broadcast the new L1C civil signal. Shared by other international global navigation satellite systems, like Galileo, the L1C signal will improve future connectivity worldwide for commercial and civilian users.

“Once on orbit, the advanced technology of this first GPS III space vehicle will begin playing a major role in the Air Force’s plan to modernize the GPS satellite constellation,” said Johnathon Caldwell, Lockheed Martin’s program manager for Navigation Systems. “We are excited to start bringing GPS III’s new capabilities to the world and proud to continue to serve as a valued partner for the Air Force’s positioning, navigation and timing mission systems.”

GPS III SV01 is the first of ten new GPS III satellites under contract and in full production at Lockheed Martin.  




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Headlines – November 19, 2018

News Here’s what Pentagon’s first-ever audit found – The Pentagon’s first-ever audit discovered major flaws in how it handles IT processes and challenges with its internal tracking databases, but did not discover any major cases of fraud or abuse.     Business Australia makes its pick for drone fleet – Australian Defence Minister Christopher Pyne...
 
 

News Briefs – November 19, 2018

U.S. military chief says tech giants should work with Pentagon The top U.S. military officer says it’s problematic that American tech companies don’t want to work with the Pentagon but are willing to engage with the Chinese market. U.S. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Joseph Dunford told the Halifax International Security Forum Nov....
 
 
virgin-galactic9

Virgin Orbit completes successful captive-carry flight test with ‘flying launchpad’

VICTORVILLE, Calif.— On Nov. 18, a new sight appeared in the baby-blue skies over Southern California: A specially modified 747-400 carrying a 70-foot-long rocket under its wing soared through the air as part of a successful ...