Local

February 8, 2019
 

Spaceflight rocket motor donated to the Smithsonian

virgin-motor
Sir Richard Branson along with staff of Virgin Galactic and The Spaceship Company donated the hybrid rocket motor which powered SpaceShipTwo, VSS Unity, to space for the first time Dec. 13, 2018, has been donated to the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

Sir Richard Branson, along with company staff and guests, were in Washington Feb. 7 to make the announcement.

The rocket motor was unveiled during the ceremony and will be exhibited in the museum’s planned, new commercial space flight gallery to be called ‘Future of Spaceflight.’

Designed and built by TSC, Virgin Galactic’s sister manufacturing organisation, the motor has been confirmed by Guinness World Records as the Most powerful hybrid rocket to be used in manned flight — a title which will be shared by both companies.

“The SpaceShipTwo rocket motor is a fitting addition to the National Air and Space Museum’s collection,” said Ellen Stofan, John and Adrienne Mars Director of the National Air and Space Museum. “It does not just represent technical achievement. It is sure to also inspire our visitors by demonstrating what can be achieved through entrepreneurial innovation.”

Weighing in at approximately 3,000 pounds, with 320kN of thrust and a burn duration of around 60 seconds, the motor created sufficient energy to propel VSS Unity to space at almost three times the speed of sound.

TSC, based in Mojave, Calif., will be supplying Virgin Galactic with all rocket motors required to meet its test and commercial flight requirements, both for VSS Unity and for the SpaceShipTwo fleet which will follow — those vehicles also built by TSC for Virgin Galactic.

The donated rocket motor, or more accurately, the Case-Throat-Nozzle assembly, is an integral part of SpaceShipTwo’s hybrid propulsion system — a design which seeks to combine the simplicity of a solid rocket motor with the controllability of a liquid engine — meaning SpaceShipTwo’s rocket motor can be shut down quickly and safely at any point during flight. The hybrid propulsion system has very few moving parts, resulting in a simple, robust design for human spaceflight application.

Announcing the donation, Branson said, “We’re proud to be making history as we work towards launching the world’s first commercial space line, and today we could not be more delighted to donate a piece of that history to the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum for its wonderful new exhibition. The desire to explore space has been an inspiration since time began and, in recent decades, an incredible catalyst for innovation. I hope our donation will also play a small part in inspiring the thousands of visitors as they pass through the new gallery in years to come.”

George Whitesides, CEO of The Spaceship Company and Virgin Galactic, said, “To see this rocket go from concept, to production, through ground test, and finally into space, and then be accepted to the world’s most respected aerospace museum is a well-deserved recognition for the spaceship propulsion team.”

Enrico Palermo, President of The Spaceship Company said: “This motor and its development process is a perfect example of what can be achieved when talented people come together to work on their dreams. TSC looks forward to building more rocket motors and the fleet of SpaceShipTwo’s, watching them provide the power to open space and change the world for good.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Courtesy photograph

High Desert Hangar Stories: Tony LeVier and the wall

Courtesy photograph Tony LeVier and ground crew with the XF-90. With all due respect to the rock group Pink Floyd, back in 1950 there were very few “bricks in the wall” known as the sound barrier. Today, a multitude of pilo...
 
 
NASA photograph by Elvia Valenzuela

Explore to flight: Educators launch a lunar buggy through engineering design process

NASA photograph by Elvia Valenzuela A group of educators participated in a workshop to learn how to use the Engineering Design Process to create, build and test a lunar buggy. A group of educators learned how to apply the Engin...
 
 
Photograph courtesy of Johnny Armstrong

The Golden Era of Test Flight: Another iconic aerospace hero has flown west

NASA photograph Test pilot John A. Manke with the M2-F3. NASA Test Pilot John A. Manke, Sr., age 87, passed away Jan. 31, 2019. A long-time resident of the Antelope Valley, Manke was born Nov. 13, 1931, in Selby, S.D. Manke att...