Kirtland AFB supports funeral for fallen WWII sailor

0
753
Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Austin J. Prisbrey

U.S. Navy Capt. Joseph Quintana, Navy Operational Support Center Albuquerque, presents a flag to Jerry Clark, nephew of U.S. Navy Fireman First Class Billy James Johnson, at the Santa Fe National Cemetery in Santa Fe, N.M. Aug. 19, 2019. Technological advances with mitochondrial DNA allowed his primary next of kin to provide a DNA sample which lead to positive identification of his uncle. Of the 429 Sailors that lost their lives on the USS Oklahoma during the attack on Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941, only 35 were later positively identified with this advance technology.
 

Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Austin J. Prisbrey

Members of the Kirtland Air Force Base Honor Guard present arms while U.S. Navy Information Specialist First Class Monica Lujan (left) Navy Operational Support Center Albuquerque, plays taps during a funeral ceremony for U.S. Navy Fireman First Class Billy James Johnson at the Santa Fe National Cemetery in Santa Fe, N.M. Aug. 19, 2019. Johnson was the son of William Gould Johnson and Zelah Adeline Dodson. He was one of eight children, born Nov. 24, 1919 in Caney, Ky. Johnson spent his teenage years in Chama, N.M.
 
Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Austin J. Prisbrey

U.S. Navy Information Specialist First Class Monica Lujan, Navy Operational Support Center Albuquerque, plays taps at a funeral ceremony for U.S. Navy Fireman First Class Billy James Johnson at the Santa Fe National Cemetery in Santa Fe, N.M. Aug. 19, 2019. Johnson was the son of William Gould Johnson and Zelah Adeline Dodson. He was one of eight children, born Nov. 24, 1919 in Caney, Ky. Johnson spent his teenage years in Chama, N.M.
 
Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Austin J. Prisbrey

Members of the Kirtland Air Force Base Honor Guard present arms at a funeral ceremony for U.S. Navy Fireman First Class Billy James Johnson at the Santa Fe National Cemetery in Santa Fe, N.M. Aug. 19, 2019. Technological advances with mitochondrial DNA allowed his primary next of kin to provide a DNA sample which lead to positive identification of Johnson. Of the 429 Sailors that lost their lives when the USS Oklahoma was sunk in the attack on Pearl Harbor, only 35 were later positively identified with this advance technology.
 
Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Austin J. Prisbrey

Members of the Kirtland Air Force Base Honor Guard stand at attention during a funeral ceremony for U.S. Navy Fireman First Class Billy James Johnson at the Santa Fe National Cemetery in Santa Fe, N.M. Aug. 19, 2019. Johnson was amongst 429 crewmembers of the USS Oklahoma who lost their lives when the battleship came under surprise attack and completely sunk at Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941.
 
Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Austin J. Prisbrey

The remains of U.S. Navy Fireman First Class Billy James Johnson were laid to rest at the Santa Fe national Cemetery in Santa Fe, N.M. Aug. 19, 2019. A funeral detail and firing party were made up of members of the Kirtland Air Force Base Honor Guard for the funeral.
 
Air Force photograph by Airman 1st Class Austin J. Prisbrey

Members of the Kirtland Air Force Base Honor Guard salute the remains of U.S. Navy Fireman First Class Billy James Johnson at the Santa Fe National Cemetery in Santa Fe, N.M. Aug. 19, 2019. Johnson was amongst 429 crewmembers of the USS Oklahoma who lost their lives when the battleship came under surprise attack and completely sunk at Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941.