Health & Safety

March 22, 2012

Air Force changes fitness statements in performance reports policy

Revisions to the Air Force fitness program took effect July 1, 2010. These modifications, improvements and upgrades brought about some of the most significant changes to fitness standards in the last five years and shift a greater level of responsibility for maintaining year-round physical fitness to all Airmen. 

The Air Force Fitness Program goal is to motivate Airmen to participate in a year-round physical conditioning program that emphasizes total fitness, to include proper aerobic conditioning, strength and flexibility training, and healthy eating. Health benefits from an active lifestyle will increase productivity, optimize health, and decrease absenteeism while maintaining a higher level of readiness.

RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE, Texas  — Air Force supervisors can now make comments regarding unit fitness program achievements on annual performance reports due to a recent policy change.

The new policy allows supervisors to include comments on successful achievements regarding the unit fitness program for Airmen who play a key role in the unit’s program. Previous guidance, released in 2007, restricted fitness comments to only physical training leaders or unit fitness program managers.

“People who are in unit leadership positions promote fitness as part of their normal duties,” said Tech. Sgt. Jimmy Simmons, Air Force Evaluations noncommissioned officer in charge at the Air Force Personnel Center. “Previous restrictions prevented them from getting much-deserved credit for their participation role in unit success.”

The new guidance also lifts the restriction on where fitness comments can be placed.

The 2007 guidance restricted fitness achievement comments to a specific section of the enlisted performance reports, but under the new guidance, comments are allowed in any of the comment sections on the Air Force performance reports, said Master Sgt. Ulanda Phelps, Air Force Evaluations superintendent.

The guidance applies to officers evaluation forms as well.

“The change gives flexibility back to the supervisors, which enables them to accurately assess Airmen who voluntarily contribute to the success of the unit’s fitness program,” Phelps said.

Comments regarding an Airman’s fitness failures, including individual fitness scores or category, are still prohibited unless it is a referral report.

For information about Airman assessments and other personnel programs, visit the Air Force Personnel Services website at https://gum-crm.csd.disa.mil.





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