Air Force

April 26, 2012

Missing personnel records impact more than promotions

Erin Tindell
Air Force Personnel, Services and Manpower Public Affairs

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO – RANDOLPH, Texas (AFNS) — When Senior Master Sgt. Randy Scanlan wasn’t promoted to his current rank the first time his records met the board, he was a little confused.

As a maintainer and an aerial gunner, he deployed often and received many decorations. When he was asked if he wanted to review his records before they met the board, he said no and figured they were “good to go.” However, they were far from complete, and he later discovered his records were missing 14 medals.

“The board had no idea what my capabilities and experiences were, so that may have prevented me from making it the first time,” said Scanlan, who is currently the Air Force Personnel Center Career Assistance Adviser functional manager.

“I used to believe it wasn’t my job to get items into my records,” he said. “After arriving at AFPC, I realized your personnel records affect every aspect of your career. It is imperative that you review your own records for accuracy. I thought it wasn’t my job, but I was wrong — it was my responsibility.”

Missing or inaccurate enlisted or officer performance reports, decorations, awards and citations can not only affect promotions, it may also prevent Airmen from being selected for special-duty assignments, professional development opportunities or re-enlistment considerations. This is why it’s critical all Airmen take the time to review their personnel records to ensure they are complete and accurate, officials said.

“Leaders need to communicate to our youngest Airmen, both officer and enlisted, when they first enter the service the importance of reviewing their personnel record as they grow in their career,” said Will Brown, the Air Force Evaluations and Recognition Programs branch chief. “No one knows an Airman’s record better than the Airman the record pertains to.”

As the Air Force continues to drawdown to meet congressionally-mandated end-strength, having accurate records is also valuable during force management measures to reshape the force. Records impact force management programs such as high year tenure, date of separation rollbacks, selective early retirement boards as well as crossflow opportunities for officers and retraining opportunities for enlisted members.

Brown said missing or inaccurate records may also impact Airmen when it is time to retire or separate.

“Civilian employers may want to look at your performance reports when applying for jobs,” he said.

Officials offered the following tips for personnel records:

— Check personnel records frequently via the Personnel Records Display Application located on AFPC’s secure website and the Air Force portal.

— Keep copies of anything you sign, such as an evaluation report, and keep the copies in a personal file.

— If you are meeting a board (for promotions, special assignments, etc.) always review your record before the board meets in enough time to fix anything wrong.

Airmen who notice discrepancies in their records should contact an installation military personnel section to help correct them.

For more information about personnel records and other personnel programs, visit the Air Force Personnel Services website at https://gum-crm.csd.disa.mil.




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