Local

May 3, 2012

25th OWS keeps heads in the clouds

Tags:
Senior Airman Brittany Dowdle
355th Fighter Wing Public Affairs
OWS_pict3
U.S. Air Force Airmen of the 25th Operational Weather Squadron, are partaking in a class to sharpen their forecasting skills on D-M, April 25. The class is taught by two retired weather forecasters, a former master sergeant and Senior master sergeant.

The 25th Operational Weather Squadrons is one of three weather squadrons who forecast weather in the United States.

After completing a seven-month technical training course at Keesler AFB, Miss., Airmen come to the 25th OWS for two years of on-the-job training before going to their individual Weather Flights and Detachments to support Army and Air Force operations. In their two years here, Airmen will spend three months in the classroom and on the operations floor for hands-on training. After completion of the training, personnel begin providing operational forecasts for the western part of the United States.

The 25th OWS is divided into three operational flights, the North flight, the Central flight, and the South flight, all with different reigns of responsibility.

The North flight is responsible for 24 Department of Defense locations in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, and Montana. The Central flight is responsible for 28 DoD locations in northern California, Nevada, and Colorado. The South flight is responsible for 31 DoD locations in southern California, Arizona, New Mexico, and west Texas.

“In the western U.S., forecasters are very important because of all the complex terrain features that can limit operations especially during the Southwest monsoon season,” said Senior Airmen Phillip Shumaker, 25th OWS shift supervisor. “The mountainous and intricate terrain can act as a trigger for severe thunderstorms, create turbulence, and even channel severe winds.”

The 25th OWS is responsible for the flight weather briefings, COMUS weather graphics, installation forecasts, and weather watches, warnings and advisories (WWAs) for the locations under their directives.

“While an important part of our duty is to create forecasts, our primary responsibility is to issue watches, warnings, and advisories for significant weather phenomena,” Shumaker said. “More specifically, WWAs are issued to protect the personnel and assets at each location.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

New tool to improve cleanup at Tucson-area AF plant

The AF Civil Engineer Center has found a new method to remove toxins trapped in naturally occurring dense soils, like clay, in Tucson called Hrydrofracturing. During the 1950s to the early 1970s, Air Force Plant 44 in Tucson, a government-owned, contractor-operated manufacturing facility, disposed of metals and solvents which led to soil and groundwater contamination...
 
 

D-M to host 2nd annual Pat’s Run

Davis-Monthan is scheduled to host the Second Annual DMAFB Pat’s Run Troop Run on Saturday, April 25 at 8 a.m. The ruck/walk/run will begin at the Benko Fitness Center and will be 4.2 miles long. This event can be enjoyed by all family members! Cost for adults is $20.00 and children 12 and under are...
 
 

Dreamliner lands, defuels at D-M en route to Pima Air & Space Museum

A Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner is towed across Valencia Road to the Pima Air & Space Museum after landing and defueling at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, March 26. The aircraft is the first large commercial aircraft to feature an airframe made almost entirely of composite materials rather than aluminum. A Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner is towed on...
 

 
(U.S. Air National Guard Photo by Staff Sgt. Erich B. Smith)

162nd Wing provides assistance as D-M security forces goes “down range”

For decades now, the 162nd Wing and Davis-Monthan Air Force Base have maintained the presence of global air power in the Tucson skies while invoking a patriotic sprit in the community. Their military presence, however, is not e...
 
 
(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Chris Drzazgowski)

355th Communication Squadron stands up call center

On April 1, the 355th Communications Squadron launched a new call center here for D-M customers to receive local customer support from the 355th Cobras rather than from The Enterprise Service Desk. Customers should continue usi...
 
 

Dreamliner lands at D-M en route to Pima Air & Space Museum

(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Chris Massey) A Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner is towed across Valencia Road to the Pima Air & Space Museum after landing and defueling at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, March 26. The aircraft is the first large commercial aircraft to feature an airframe made almost entirely of composite materials...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin