Health & Safety

May 3, 2012

AADD in the driver’s seat for Airmen wingmanship

Senior Airman Brittany Dowdle
355th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

If an Airman is out drinking with some friends on a Friday night, and they turn around to find that their designated driver has succumb to the temptation and festivities around and started knocking back a drink or two, and then they realized they had spent all their money in the spirit of the evening, what should they do? Fortunately, they can call Airmen Against Drunk Driving for a ride home.

The AADD Program serves as a backup designated driver service available Friday and Saturday nights from 10 p.m. to 3 a.m. This is a service for the base populace and their family members.

The purpose of AADD is to prevent injuries and loss of life which often results from driving under the influence. AADD tries to help reduce the number of DUIs among base personnel and educate Airmen on the severe consequences of drinking and driving.

“Airmen Against Drunk Driving is a wonderful program that perpetuates the wingman concept,” said Staff Sgt. Ecatarina Erk, AADD secretary. “We don’t want to lose any Airmen to a bad decision. It saves lives and careers, and there’s nothing more important than that.”

The program is run on a volunteer basis. Anyone associated with the military can volunteer to help with AADD. This year, 228 people have volunteered to help save lives as part of the program.

“My goal with this organization is to give as many people as possible the chance to volunteer to help them grow personally and professionally,” said Tech. Sgt. Kyle Rojas, AADD president. “Also, for them to be part of something bigger than themselves and to have the chance to possibly save lives with every person that’s picked up.”

AADD does not take last names so there is no reason to be worried about reprisal. It is a confidential program and no one is reported for using the program, unless the person does something inappropriate to the driver or their car.

AADD will pick up the individual from their location and take them home, within 20 miles of the base. The program is not designed to be a taxi service. It’s the backup to the backup plan. It should not be used as a primary plan. AADD has helped 239 people so far in 2012.

For more information about AADD, contact TSgt Rojas at 228-9595. To request a ride with AADD, call 850-2233.




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