May 3, 2012

Aero Camp takes off at Double Eagle Aviation the first week of June

David S. Ricker
Staff Writer
Catherine Stypa sits in the cockpit of one of the airplanes used in the flight school at Double Eagle Aviation. Stypa is a student at Double Eagle Aviation and will also participate the summer camp.

A number of young people in and around Tucson will have their heads in the clouds, literally, this summer as a part of the Aero Camp at Double Eagle Aviation at the Tucson International Airport (TIA).

The summer flight camp for young people, grades 6-12, will take place at Double Eagle Aviation, 6961 S. Apron Drive, beginning June 4.

Soon there will be a serious shortage of qualified pilots in America, explained Tim Amalong, president of Double Eagle Aviation. New flight requirements placed upon incoming pilots is making it difficult for some to meet the new skill requirements necessary to become licensed and find flight employment. “After 9/11, the aviation industry has been hurting pretty bad. There’s a huge shortage of professional pilots out there,” said Amalong. “Double Eagle has been around for over 28 years. I’ve owned it since 2004.”

Aero Camp is designed to provide an early opportunity for teens to enjoy and learn about the vast and exciting opportunities that await them in the aviation and aerospace industry. “What we are trying to do is encourage the younger generation to get out there and do flight training and get them around the environment and show them what it’s all about,” Amalong said.

He suggested numerous aviation career paths for young people to consider. “You can be a corporate pilot, a military pilot or fly for the airlines. There are a lot of different options out there,” Amalong added.

The North American Flight School Association, of which Double Eagle is a member, is promoting summer camps across the country. “This is, pretty much, becoming a nationwide summer camp,” Amalong explained.

One of the scheduled participants in Aero Camp will be Catherine Stypa, 15, a home-schooled high school freshman, who has always had an interest in aviation. “As a kid, I thought it would be fun, but I never really thought that I could actually do it,” she said.

Stypa’s father was acquainted with someone who knew about Double Eagle Aviation and the flight schools the company runs. “I’ve been at it about a year-and-a-half now,” she said, with a smile.

Student pilots are required to be 16-years-old before they are allowed to solo or fly without a licensed instructor pilot. “It’s 16 to solo and 17 to take your check ride for a private license,” Amalong explained. “She can’t solo right now. She can land and take off. The game plan for Catherine is to have her solo on her 16th birthday unless she’s having a big party, and when she’s 17, she can have a check ride on her birthday.”

Stypa said she is leaning towards pursuing aviation as a career path. “There’s medical school or being a lawyer, but aviation is something that I really enjoy so I think it would be a really cool career to do,” she said.

Stypa said ground school aviation training has proven to be a challenge and provided her with incentive to establish good study habits. “I was one of those people who though that in learning how to fly an airplane you would just go up there and Tim would show me which buttons to press and this and that,” she offered. “But, there is so much to it and you have to be willing to put the work in.”

As a counselor at Aero Camp, Stypa plans to share her experiences with fellow students. There are two camps from which to choose:

Aero Camp Basic–Grades 6-8–This beginner’s camp is for those who have little or no previous aviation knowledge. They will enjoy learning about:

  • What makes an airplane fly.
  • Who flies airplanes and what careers are available in aviation.
  • The airplane’s flight controls and instruments.
  • How to conduct a pre-flight inspection.
  • Basic information on how to conduct radio communications.
  • The concept of airport traffic patterns.
  • Field trips to various destinations at TIA.
  • The basics of aeronautical charts.
  • Orientation flight time of up to one hour of flight time that is eligible for the student’s pilot log.

In the Basic Camp, students can log up to an hour of flying. “The basic camp is going to be for the sixth through eighth graders. The advance camp is ninth through twelth,” Amalong said. “We don’t require the kids to fly. It’s more expensive if they want to fly, less than a hundred dollars more.”

Aero Camp Advanced–Grades 9-12–Teens with some aviation knowledge or experience will learn about:

  • A basics recap: what makes an airplane fly, who flies airplanes and what careers are available in aviation, airplane flight controls and instruments.
  • Performing an actual pre-flight inspection.
  • Advanced information on how to conduct radio communications.
  • Insights into airport traffic patterns.
  • How to plan a cross-country flight and make the flight.
  • Studying written test questions of the Federal Aviation Administration.
  • Field trips to various destinations at the airport.
  • How to study aeronautical charts.
  • Flight instruction of two-three hours of flight time that is eligible for the student’s pilot log.

The goal of the basic camp is to get young people around the aviation industry because there are numerous careers available including: mechanics, avionics, ticketing and baggage agents. “A lot of these kids have never been around an airplane, much less been in one,” Amalong said.

Enrollment in the basic camps is being limited to 10 students at this point. “The first two weeks of June we’re having two Basic Camps,” Amalong said. “The third week of June we’re going to have an Advanced Camp.”

If Double Eagle has a lot of interest there is the flexibility of holding two camps simultaneously with different instructors. “We plan on doing this all summer long,” Amalong said.

Amalong is the past president of the 162nd Fighter Wing Minuteman Committee and is also a member of the DM 50 at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. “Supporting the military is huge for me,” he pointed out.

Thus, Aero Camp is being offered at a discount for young people in military families. “If we can get their kids around aviation, to actually be able to fly in these planes and be in the planes and learn more about it, a lot of them be want to be a pilot and perhaps fly in the military,” Amalong said.

More information regarding Aero Camp at Double Eagle Aviation can be obtained by calling (520) 294-8214 or on the Internet at The weekly Aero Camp starts June 4, and runs through the summer. Spaces are limited. Camp is held Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


U.S. Air Force photo/ Master Sgt. Luke Johnson

Rescue Group security forces Airmen experience total force helicopter training

A 943rd Rescue Group Detachment 1 Security Forces Airman took part in training exercise that helped prepare him and other service members to safely maneuver around helicopters in a deployed environment.

MDG providing sports physical appointments

As the 2012-2013 school year quickly approaches, children may need to get a school or sports physical. The 355th Medical Group is working hard to meet this need by modifying the daily schedule to make appointments available. We continue to have open duty day appointments, so your best and fastest option is to call 228-2778...

AF Academy instructor vacancies available

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, TEXAS (AFNS) — Eligible active duty officers interested in U.S. Air Force Academy instructor opportunities have until Aug. 31 to apply, Air Force Personnel Center officials announced. “This special duty assignment is a controlled, three-year maximum tour and officers must be released by their Air Force Personnel Center core officer assignment...


Don’t get carried away during monsoon season

A monsoon can be described as a seasonal shift in the prevailing wind direction, that usually brings with it a different kind of weather. From the month of June all the way through September, known as monsoon season in Arizona, the “different kind of weather” is rain, and lots of it. In 2011, more than...

Warrior of the Week July 27, 2012

Family: Chet (husband), Vincent (son) Hometown: Air Force Brat, no hometown Unit: 355th Operations Support Squadron

AF releases mid-year selective re-enlistment bonus list, changes

WASHINGTON (AFNS) — Air Force officials today released the fiscal year 2012 mid-year selective re-enlistment bonus list along with some changes to the program. In addition to a rebalance in overall payments, the Air Force identified 53 Air Force specialties, down from 78, to receive bonuses. Based on the semiannual program review that began in...


Be the first to comment!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>