Health & Safety

June 7, 2012

“If you can’t see ‘em… “

Tags:
Airman 1st Class Camilla A Griffin
355th Fighter Wing Public Affairs
(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Camilla A Griffin)
U.S. Air Force Maj. Daniel Patak, 357th Fighter Squadron A-10 instructor pilot, receives an eye exam done by U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Jennifer Caddell, 355th Aerospace Medicine Squadron optometry flight non-commissioned officer in charge, here May 30. The optometry flight sees about 700 to 900 patients a month for everything from eye exams to glasses fitting.

Airmen from the 355th Medical Group Aerospace Medicine Squadron optometry clinic help keep Desert Lightning Team members’ eyes on the prize, at home and downrange.

“Optometry technicians generally don’t deploy in their career field, unless you have the ophthalmology experience and the surgical experience, then you are usually picked up for deployment,” said Tech Sgt. Jennifer Caddell, Optometry Clinic non-commissioned officer in charge. “So if you don’t have that training and the certification, optometry techs typically don’t deploy unless filling the slots for Third Country Nationals Duty.”

When Airmen of the optometry flight are not filling slots for TCN Duty, they are supporting humanitarian missions such as the one in Haiti in 2010.

“We primarily support the humanitarian missions here at D-M,” Caddell said.

“We support the Arctic Care Mission up in Alaska providing medical care to remote villages that don’t necessarily have it,” said Caddell. “Air Force, Army and Navy doctors go up and provide the care, not just optic care, but medical care in general. We also have missions in South America.”

The 355th AMS Optometry clinic is the only Air Combat Command optometry office that has a Deployment Ophthalmic Team kit. “So a lot of times if we cannot fill manning requirements we will provide our kit so they can provide the care that is needed.”

When Airmen are going through a deployment checklist, they go to optometry to ensure their vision requirements are met. “For individuals who require glasses, it is essential that they have gas mask inserts and two pairs of glasses for their deployment, as well as any ballistic protective eyewear inserts that may be required on their reporting instructions,” Caddell said.

At the clinic there are examples of the ballistic eyewear on the Authorized Protective Eyewear List. The ballistic approved eyewear is provided to Airmen by their Unit Deployment Managers if their career field requires them. If not they can be purchased at clothing sales.

There is also a program called Aircrew Soft Contact Lens Program. This program allows aircrew members who require vision correction to be fitted for specific contacts prescribed by the clinic.

“We make contact with anywhere from 700 to 900 patients a month,” Caddell said. “That includes patients picking up glasses to patients coming in to remove a piece of metal from their eye. We primarily see Active duty members of all military branches for the extent of the services we offer, but can also order glasses for retirees as well.”

Although the 355th Medical Group does not provide emergency care, the optometry clinic does provide urgent care for active duty members who might have suffered an injury to their eyes.

“If we cannot handle in something in-house we refer them to specific locations off-base that have an ophthalmologist on call 24 hours-a-day,” Caddell said.

The 355th AMS optometry flight does their best to keep D-M’s Airmen mission ready at all times. And as the optometry flight says, “If you can’t see ‘em… You can’t shoot ‘em.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
(U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Brett Clashman)

“Solicit help; don’t hide”

Over the years, the term “Wingman” has evolved in the Air Force. The traditional military definition of a Wingman refers to the pattern in which fighter jets fly. There is always a lead aircraft and another which flies off ...
 
 

Adaptability a ‘must’ in today’s Air Force

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. – Three years ago, I entered the Air Force as a general dentist. After completing four challenging years of dental school, I was eager to serve in the Air Force and use my newly developed skills to provide quality care to Airmen. What I quickly came to realize was the misconception that...
 
 

Local Briefs July 18, 2014

355th FW to hold active shooter training exercise July 29, 7 p.m. The 355th Fighter Wing will be conducting an active shooter training exercise starting at approximately 7 p.m. local, Tuesday, July 29. Multiple facilities and locations on base will be affected, but the overall impact to normal operations will be minimal for those who...
 

 
PilotForADay_pict3

Pilot for a Day: Trevor Pahl

. D-M firefighters help Trevor Pahl spray a fire truck. D-M has been supporting the Pilot for a Day program, which was designed to focus on children who have serious or chronic health conditions, for more than 10 years. Airman ...
 
 

Existing tools help users reduce PII breaches

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-LACKLAND, Texas (AFNS) – Members of 24th Air Force are refurbishing an old email tool to help Air Force users reduce breaches of personally identifiable information, or PII. The Digital Signature Enforcement Tool, or DSET, which currently prompts users to provide a digital signature when an email contains an active hyperlink or attachment,...
 
 
Loft_pict

The Loft: a way to connect, serve, grow

Are you looking for a way to connect, serve, and grow? Come visit the DMAFB Airman’s Ministry Center, more commonly known as “The Loft!”  The Loft is a center for DM single airmen located on the second floor of building ...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin