Air Force

June 14, 2012

Airmen of the 55th Rescue Squadron return home from a 125-day deployment

Tags:
Airman 1st Class Camilla Griffin
355th Fighter Wing Public Affairs
(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Camilla Griffin)
U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Douglas Jones, 923rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron assistant weapons section chief, is welcomed home by his daughter, Ainsley Jones, three, from a deployment at June 4. A deployed rescue squadron has a total of three hours to report to an alert, the 55th RQS has that time down to 25 minutes.

Airmen from the 55th Rescue Squadron returned from a 125-day deployment in Southwest Asia June 4.

Families and friends awaited the more than 50 Airmen who deployed at the 55th Rescue Squadron hangar and watched as the C-17, Globemaster landed and taxied to its drop-off location. Children, spouses, mother and fathers held up “Welcome Home” signs waiting for their Airmen to emerge from the crowd and walk their way. Faces lit up and eyes watered at the sight of their heroes in their Airmen Battle Uniform finally coming home to them.

Members of the 55th RQS have been constantly rotating deployments for the past three years.

“We have covered every operation in that theater, everywhere from Iraq, Afghanistan and now Southwest Asia,” said Senior Master Sgt. Max Rippel, 923rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron aircraft support flight superintendent. “We maintained any alert, any crash, anyone who needed us the entire time.”

A deployed rescue squadron has a total of three hours to report to an alert, the 55th RQS has that time down to 25 minutes.

“The primary duty of the deployed Airmen for the past four months was to be on alert for Combat Search and Rescue missions 24-hours-a-day. They also took care of any other mission that came up along the way,” said Master Sgt. Keith Hurst, 55th Helicopter Maintenance Unit section chief.

During their support to Operation Enduring Freedom, aerial gunners and flight engineers had a fire rate of 99 percent with a total of 30,000 .50 cal rounds and 56,000 mini-gun rounds used.

“While deployed we had a total of 5,712 mission capable hours,” Rippel said. “The Airmen were on 24-hour alert operations seven days a week, and we usually have everything on the complex so we don’t have to go far, but there wasn’t any mermites (food storage capabilities)on this deployment so we had to figure out how to break guys up to go to the chow hall. It was a challenge but all of us busted our butts and made it happen.”

The 55th RQS completed a total of 125 sorties, 296 flight hours and maintained 100 percent mission effectiveness.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

AFSOUTH trains for humanitarian crisis, joint operations

Air Forces Southern joined forces with the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Southern Command and multiple other federal agencies to improve their ability to operate as a team in the event of a mass migration, Feb. 20-27, in Exercise Integrated Advance 2015. Integrated Advance (IA) is a biennial U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM)-sponsored interagency exercise that...
 
 
(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Chris Massey)

Air Force places 18 A-10 aircraft into ‘Backup Status’

WASHINGTON (AFNS) — The Air Force, with congressional authorization, will convert 18 primary combat-coded A-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft from active units and place them into Backup-Aircraft Inventory (BAI) status with th...
 
 
(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Cheyenne Morigeau)

Fuels Management team finds a new home

The 355th Logistics Readiness Squadron held a ribbon cutting ceremony to celebrate the completion of their new Fuels Management facility and Type III Fuels Hydrant System facility at D-M, Sept. 17, 2014. The new facilities are ...
 

 

Why Air Force Smart Operations – or AFSO?

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO – RANDOLPH, TEXAS — Confucius once said that in order for a man to move a mountain he must first begin by carrying away its small stones. Now, if one is to imagine the Air Force as that giant mountain, how does an Airman begin trying to move it? That is,...
 
 

AEF Teaming brings new order of business to deployments

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. — For many Airmen deployments are hard to understand, and for leaders they’re hard to sell and to sustain. Implemented in October 2014, Air Expeditionary Forces Teaming was designed as a way to improve predictability, visibility and stability for units and Airmen while maintaining the flexibility to satisfy combatant commander requirements downrange....
 
 
(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Frank Casciotta)

New Airmen get their bearings

VANCE AIR FORCE BASE, Okla. — New Airmen go through a whirlwind of activities during the transformation of civilian to active duty Airman, which can be a confusing process. Lucky for new Airmen, there’s the First Term A...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin