Health & Safety

June 14, 2012

June is Men’s Health Month

Capt. Angela L. Shockley
355th Medical Group

Men’s Health Month emphasizes health issues and raises awareness of preventable problems. The hope is to encourage early detection and treatment of diseases. Part of being aware is looking at lifestyle choices, such as diet habits, exercise, smoking and alcohol use.

Men can be safer, stronger, and healthier by taking the following steps:

  • Learn your family health history
  • Are there any conditions or diseases that have occurred within your family unit? Your family history can influence your risk of developing heart disease, stroke, diabetes, or cancer.
  • Know and understand your numbers. I bet you know your favorite team’s or player’s stats, but what about your own? Keep track of your numbers for blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol and body mass index (BMI).
  • Pay attention to signs and symptoms. Warning signs males may experience are excessive thirst, rash, difficulty with urination, chest pain or shortness of breath.  If you have symptoms, be sure to see your doctor right away. Keep in mind that a physical exam or screening test may be needed to correctly diagnosis and treat a problem.
  • Take daily action to improve health.
  • Lack of sleep can be associated with diseases or conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity and depression. Drowsy driving is dangerous. Adults should get 7-9 hours of sleep per night, according to the National Sleep Foundation.
  • Be active for at least two-and-a-half hours a week. Include an activity that raises your heart rate and strengthens your muscles.
  • When participating in sports, riding a bike or motorcycle make sure you, friends and family wear protective gear. Use equipment such as helmets, wrist guards, and knee and elbow pads. Wear seat belts as a driver and a passenger in a car.
  • Eat what counts. Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables every day. Limit foods and drinks high in calories, sugar, salt, fat, and alcohol. Always choose healthy snacks.

Be smoke-free

Avoid cigarette smoking, smokeless tobacco and inhaling secondhand smoke. Kicking the habit has immediate and long-term benefits. Within 20 minutes after smoking that last cigarette, your body begins a series of changes that continue for years.

Work with your PCM and Nursing Staff to stay healthy

Call your PCM at to make an appointment today! The number to the appointment line is (520) 228-2778.

 

Capt Angela L. Shockley

Nurse Manager, Flight Medicine

355 Medical Group

 





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