Health & Safety

June 21, 2012

2011 Consumer Confidence Report for Davis-Monthan AFB

The 355th Civil Engineer Squadron (CES) and the 355th Bioenvironmental Engineering Flight (BEF) are pleased to present to you the 2011 Annual Water Quality Report for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base.  This report, also known as the Consumer Confidence Report, is required by the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) and is designed to provide details about where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to standards set by regulatory agencies.  This report will inform you about the quality water and services we deliver to you every day.  We want you to understand the efforts we make to continuously improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources.  Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water.  We ask your support in protecting and conserving our water resources.  They are critical to the continued well-being of our community, our way of life, and our children’s future.

Is my water safe?

Yes, your water is safe!  Please continue reading below to get a detailed look at the Davis-Monthan drinking water program and what the D-M Drinking Water team does for you every day.

Where does my water come from?

Davis-Monthan AFB supplies drinking water to around 10,000 customers each and every day.  This water is pulled directly from the Fort Lowell Aquifer via eight groundwater wells located across the base, and is monitored and maintained by personnel from the 355th Fighter Wing.

Source water assessment and its availability

All drinking water is chlorinated for disinfection purposes. On a weekly basis, the 355th Bioenvironmental Engineering Flight monitors the base drinking water to ensure chlorination, acidity, and bacteriological contamination falls within an acceptable range.  Additional sampling is performed on a periodic basis for other contaminants to ensure our drinking water remains compliant with safety regulations set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Why are there contaminants in my drinking water?

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791) between 1000-1600 daily.

As water travels across the surface of the land or dissolves through the ground it picks up naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, naturally occurring radioactive materials.  Additionally, it can pick up any number of substances resulting from the presence of animals or human activity.  These can range from viruses or bacteria found in water treatment plants and septic systems, inorganic compounds, such as salts or metals are both naturally occurring or can result from industrial operations, and chemical contaminants such as pesticides and herbicides from farms or volatile organic compounds from industrial runoff.  The EPA sets safety limits on these contaminants in public water systems in order to ensure safe drinking water is provided to the consumer.

Do I need to take special precautions?

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Water Drinking Hotline (800-426-4791).

Additional Information for Lead

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The BEF is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. If water in your home has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

How can I get involved?

We would like you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. The Davis-Monthan Drinking Water Quality Program team members are committed to ensuring your water remains as clean as possible. If you would like additional information concerning this report, or if you have any questions about our drinking water program, please feel free to contact the Davis-Monthan Drinking Water team members directly and we will be happy to assist you in any way we can.  The Bioenvironmental Engineering Flight can be reached at 520-228-5369 or call the Civil Engineer Customer Service desk at 520-228-5503 and they can help direct you to who would best be able to answer your questions.

For more information please contact:

SSgt Kate M. Witulski

355 AMDS/SGPB

Davis Monthan AFB, AZ 85707

Phone: (520)228-5369

Fax: (520)228-4337

Water Quality Data Table

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The table below lists all of the drinking water contaminants that we detected during the calendar year of this report. Although many more contaminants were tested, only those substances listed below were found in your water. All sources of drinking water contain some naturally occurring contaminants. At low levels, these substances are generally not harmful in our drinking water. Removing all contaminants would be extremely expensive, and in most cases, would not provide increased protection of public health. A few naturally occurring minerals may actually improve the taste of drinking water and have nutritional value at low levels. Unless otherwise noted, the data presented in this table is from testing done in the calendar year of the report. The EPA or the State requires us to monitor for certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not vary significantly from year to year, or the system is not considered vulnerable to this type of contamination. As such, some of our data, though representative, may be more than one year old.  In this table you will find terms and abbreviations that might not be familiar to you.  To help you better understand these terms, we have provided the definitions below the table.




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