Health & Safety

August 23, 2012

I’ve been profiled, now what

99th Medical Group
Medical Standards Management Element

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. — Getting a profile exempting a person from one or more part of the fitness assessment is different than a profile that limits a person from doing certain things at work, and knowing the difference in the process can save service members unnecessary aggravation down the road.

A profile, or an Air Force Form 422A , or Duty Limiting Condition, Air Force Form 469, are the medical forms that serve as a recommendation from a primary care manager to the commander regarding a service member’s ability to perform daily duties while dealing with a temporary medical condition.

Every profile goes through a thorough review process by medical standards experts before being sent to the unit. This review ensures the best and most appropriate duty limitations are communicated to the patient and his or her commander and is mandated by Air Force instructions 48-123 Medical Examinations and Standards. The forms will be processed as they are received and generally take three to four duty days, depending on the case.

The process starts with the service member’s provider. Once the provider has initiated and signed the AF From 469, the medical standards management element performs an administrative review. When the review is finished, the form goes to the profiling officer, a physician, who reviews it to ensure the appropriate profiling has taken place.

Once signed by the profiling officer, an electronic copy is sent to the service member’s commander and his or her designees. The commander then considers the information on the duty-limiting condition form and approves or disapproves it. Once the commander has taken action on, the service member should receive a copy. All mobility restricting AF From 469s require commander’s approval and signature.

An AF Form 469 affecting a member’s ability to accomplish a fitness assessment requires an AF Form 422A. This form is not automatically generated. Per Air Force Regulation 10-203, TITLE OF AFI the service member is responsible for notifying his or her supervisor and unit fitness program manager when placed on a duty-limiting profile.

The UFPM will coordinate with the Health and Wellness Center to initiate the 422A. Once the profile is initiated, it undergoes a similar review process as the AF Form 469. Service members can get their completed 422A from at https://asims.afms.mil/imr/MyIMR.aspx.




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