Local

September 20, 2012

Airman, wife make harmonious music

Airman 1st Class Michael Washburn
355th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

Music is the soundtrack to our lives. We listen to it at work, at home, in the car and even when riding in elevators. Music can be an expression of our emotions for those who listen to it, as well as those who create it.

For Senior Airman Kai Eilert, 43rd Electronic Combat Group airborne cryptologic linguist, and his wife Annette, this is a day to day fact. They are both makers of music.

Airman Eilert’s musical indoctrination began at an early age.

“My family was very involved with music and that got me interested in playing an instrument,” Eilert said. “I started playing cello in fifth grade and I then played the trumpet in sixth grade. The trumpet was my primary instrument throughout high school.”

While in high school, Airman Eilert taught himself the guitar. He also dabbled in piano, bass and drums. Growing up in house where his parents were involved with music, and having a musical background, made Airman Eilert a quick study to new instruments. Soon after learning guitar, Airman Eilert became interested in another aspect of music, writing his own songs. He has been writing ever since.

Airman Eilert is not alone in his quest to craft beautiful music. Helping him along every step of the way is his wife Annette, who he met in 2010 while at church.

“She was there playing piano and singing, and I was kind of hooked on her at that point,” Eilert said. “We started playing together and writing music together. We fell in love and got married.”

As a melodious duo, Airman Eilert and Annette perform at their church weekly. Although they haven’t been able to perform at any venues, they have had the opportunity to share their music with others.

“We have played for a few campus groups from the University of Arizona, an organization called Team Challenge, which is a group that gets teenagers and older people off the streets and off drugs,” Eilert said.

For the Eilert’s, the creative process is a collaborative effort between them.

“The process is kind of back and forth,” Eilert said. “Sometimes she’ll have an idea, bring it up to me and we’ll work it out together. I do lean more toward doing the instrumental part of songs, but we usually both write the lyrics.”

Together, they have written roughly 12 songs and would one day like to compile them to make a CD.

“Making a CD can be a full time job,” Eilert said. “With me being in the Air Force and her working as well, we don’t have the time necessary for that. We do record all our songs though and put them up on YouTube.”

Annette and Airman Eilert love to make music.

To create something from nothing and share it with themselves and others is what fuels their passion.

“For my wife and I, there is a unique beauty of writing music together and then sharing it with other people,” Eilert said. “When there is a group of people singing the same song for the same reason, there’s a unity that can’t be found anywhere else. We like the interaction with others and being able to be creative in our music.”

Airman Eilert and Annette’s music can be found on their YouTube page at: http://www.youtube.com/user/FivetoTenMelodies?feature=CAoQwRs%3D

 




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