Health & Safety

October 18, 2012

Aircrew Decontamination Training

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U.S. Air Force photos by Senior Airman Timothy Moore
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U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Michael Bryant, 563rd Operations Support Squadron, helps Staff Sgt. Jonathan Rivera, 4th OSS, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., tighten a gas mask before the hands-on aircrew decontamination training here Sept. 21. Airmen from several bases under Air Combat Command came to D-M to learn the proper procedures to mitigate possible contamination on aircrews.

Airmen from all over Air Combat Command came to D-M in September to attend aircrew decontamination training. They learned a general mitigation process that could be applied to several types of personal protective equipment.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Matthew Daniels, 7th Operations Support Squadron, Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, gives a thumbs up to confirm that Staff Sgt. Jonathan Rivera, 4th OSS, Seymour Johnson AFB, N.C., can breathe during the aircrew decontamination training. The training simulated mitigating contaminates using the actual setup approved by Air Combat Command trainers.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jasper Roberts, 1st Operations Support Squadron, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., cuts the boot strings of Staff Sgt. Jonathan Rivera, 4th OSS, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., during aircrew decontamination training. Aircrew flight equipment technicians took other participants in the training through a simulated contaminate mitigation process that involved the cleaning and removing of protective equipment.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Kyle Gross, 755th Operations Support Squadron, loosens the straps on a gas mask worn by Staff Sgt Michael Bryant, 563rd OSS, during aircrew decontamination. Aircrew flight equipment technicians trained on the proper procedures to mitigate possible contaminates. The training gave a general process that could be easily adapted to different types of personal protective equipment.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jose Ibarra, 57th Weapons Support Squadron, Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., helps Staff Sgt. Kendrick Walker, 7th Operations Support Squadron, Dyess AFB, Texas, remove his gloves during aircrew decontamination training. The mitigation process is setup into two separate areas: a “clean” and “dirty” side. This ensures that personnel working on the dirty side do not bring contaminates to the clean side. It also allows personnel working on the clean side to easily replace workers on the dirty side in case of a mishap.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jason Belcher, 1st Operations Support Squadron, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., pats down Staff Sgt. Jonathan Rivera, 4th OSS, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., during aircrew decontamination training. In a real scenario, aircrew flight equipment technicians would be in mission oriented protective posture level 4 to protect themselves and others from possible contaminates. However, the training only required them to be in minimum personal protective equipment.




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(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Chris Drzazgowski)

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