Health & Safety

October 18, 2012

Desert Lightning Team encouraged to practice daily situational awareness

Tanera Jones
355th Security Forces Squadron

Tucson can be a wonderful place to live, work and play. It’s filled with picturesque desert landscapes, high mountain vistas and a melting pot of culturally diverse people with whom to enjoy life. However, as great of a place as Tucson is, there is still a need for all of us to maintain awareness of our surroundings.

Throughout the past few months a number of us, both military and military family members, have become victims of crimes such as auto theft, assault, and burglary.

As Airmen, situational awareness becomes a daily necessity while deployed down range, always vigilant and always on guard. Oftentimes that “daily vigilance” is left at our deployed location upon our return to scenic Tucson.

Situational Awareness refers to your ability to observe the things around you and make decisions about your actions based on your interpretation of those things. It includes people’s behavior, unusual or dangerous situations, and even your own actions within any common environment. It often boils down to the difference between what we see and what we observe. For example, can you say with certainty how many steps lead up to the building you work in, or any other place you frequent? Why not? You see them regularly don’t you? The reason you may be unsure is that you probably never took the time to count them. The same is true in avoiding crime. If you can observe and interpret a problem before you encounter it, you’re more likely to avoid it.

Here are a few key tips to keep yourself and family members safe in the Old Pueblo:

Stay alert for possible dangers. 

Pay attention to your surroundings, notice the people around you and avoid distractions. Walk near the curb, on the side closest to oncoming traffic. This avoids the risk of someone in a car coming unseen from behind you and grabbing you or your bag, and gives you a better angle to see in doorways or alleys and a better path to escape if attacked.

Stick to well-lighted and well populated areas. 

Criminals are far less likely to target people where there are others around or they are likely to be seen.

Travel in groups. 

Muggers are much more likely to go after individuals than groups.

Dress destination appropriate. Expensive clothes and flashy or excessive jewelry attracts attention. Try not to carry a large purse, briefcase or backpack, as anything that might contain valuables makes you a desirable target. If you’re going to the local department store, you may want to leave the jewelry at home.

Entering your vehicle. 

When approaching your car, keep watch for anything unusual or suspicious. Carry your keys in your hand. Digging for keys at your car door is a distraction. Be sure to check the passenger compartments before you get in.

Take action if you sense danger or are attacked. 

If you believe you are being followed, head directly toward a populated area, cafe, bar or other well-attended place. Make noise or call for help. Don’t be afraid to draw attention to yourself.

Bottom line… crime can happen anywhere at any time. Utilizing these easy to do tips can minimize the likelihood of you or your family members becoming a victim.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
(U.S. Air Force Illustration by Airman 1st Class Cheyenne Morigeau)

Don’t become a target

Considering recent threats against Americans and the exponential growth of social media use, becoming a target of an adversary is easier than ever. Operations Security is a process that identifies unclassified, critical informa...
 
 
BreastCancerAwareness_pict

An Airman’s story: My mother didn’t fight alone

MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. – His green eyes frantically searched the crowd for his dying mother. During his final pass and review at basic military training (BMT) he saw her in the stands, cheering him on. A year later, ...
 
 

Fire Prevention Week 2014

(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Chris Drzazgowski) Sparky the Fire Dog, National Fire Protection Association spokesdog, and members from the 355th Fire Emergency Services flight taught children from the Child Development Center how to stop, drop and roll at Davis-Monthan, Oct. 8. The 355th FES conducted several events in conjunction with Fire...
 

 

Troops to Teachers helps Airmen serve after separation

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. – For many service members who are separating from the military, finding employment that utilizes prior training or skills gained while serving can be difficult. For Airmen who are honorably discharged from their military commitment and have an interest in ‘serving’ again as an educational instructor, the Troops to Teachers program is...
 
 

Military Tuition Assistance Program implements changes for FY15

HOLLOMAN AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. – Air Force active duty Airmen who want to take advantage of the military assistance programs for voluntary education in the coming academic year can expect several changes that were implemented on Oct. 1, 2014. The new Air Force Credentialing Opportunities Online, also referred to as AF COOL, will take the place...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin