Health & Safety

November 9, 2012

How can I ride a motorcycle on base?

Tags:
Senior Airman Michael Washburn
355th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

Students of the Motorcycle Safety Basic Rider Course practice basic riding techniques on Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. The course consists of one day of in-class learning and two days of actual riding. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Timothy D. Moore)

Are you tired of riding around base on four wheels? Do you want to ditch the car and drive a motorcycle instead? If you do, there are steps one must take before you’re able to navigate the streets of Arizona.

“The first thing is to meet with a motorcycle safety representative,” said Matthew Anderson, 355th Fighter Wing Ground Safety. “The MSR will enter you into the motorcycle unit safety tracking tool program. This is a tracking system for all our motorcycle riders.”

After meeting with the squadron MSR, you have 30 days to have a face-to-face meeting with your commander.

Next, you’ll need to take the basic rider course. This is a course offered and paid for by the Air Force. As the name implies, it covers basic skills such as the proper way of taking corners, swerving and making quick stops and tight turns.

“I feel that anyone who wants to get a motorcycle should take this course first,” said Tech. Sgt. Christopher Campbell, 355th Fighter Wing Public Affairs superintendent and recent graduate of the class. “It can be very difficult. Not only do you have to balance the bike, you need to figure out the controls for it as well. You find out whether you want to get a motorcycle, or if maybe a bike is not for you.”

After completion of the BRC, the next step is entering into the mentorship program.

“For this, you’ll be paired up with an experienced rider,” Anderson said. “Mentors have a checklist of all the things they’re checking the rider for, such as keeping a margin of safety, knowing how to ride on different surfaces, and hand signals. They’re also going to check to see if you’re safety oriented.”

Mentors will sign off on the checklist after they feel the rider knows what to do in the different situations. This should be done within six months of passing the BRC.

Congratulations. After completing all the required steps, you can now ride your motorcycle. The only other thing needed is to make sure you have all the required personal protective equipment. Over the ankle footwear, long sleeved shirt, reflective vest, helmet with full face protection or a helmet with eye protection is required while driving.

Personal protective equipment could end up saving your life. According to the 355th Fighter Wing safety office, in fiscal year 2011 D-M had 27 motorcycle accidents. In fiscal year 2012 the number rose to 33.

For any information regarding the steps needed in order to ride a motorcycle on base, reference Air Force Instruction 91-207.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Tip line reports illegal acts to AFOSI

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. – Reporting suspicious activity has become much easier. The Air Force Office of Special Investigations established a tip line for the Air Force to support the insider-threat mission. The tip line is an anonymous reporting mechanism to advise law enforcement of illegal activities. It provides an easily accessible avenue for individuals to...
 
 

Enterovirus spreads throughout country, launches Flu season

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. – Enterovirus is spreading throughout the country starting from the East Coast, making its way to the West. From mid-August to Sept. 18, a total of 153 people in 18 states were confirmed to have respiratory illness caused by EV-D68. In the upcoming weeks, more states will have confirmed cases of EV-D68...
 
 

Any cruelty harmful to family

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. – “The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves.” Shakespeare October in Arizona is a time for outdoor barbecues and football tailgating parties. But October is also Domestic Violence Prevention Month. Domestic violence is one of those topics not often raised at those barbecues and tailgating parties. Yet,...
 

 
(U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Michael Voss)

When responding to surveys, check to ensure they’re official

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, Texas (AFNS) – Airmen around the world are asked to respond to many surveys, some of which are official and legitimate. Others, however, are not official and Airmen should not respond to ...
 
 

‘Quest for Zero’ debuts with focus on risk management

KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. (AFNS) — Air Force Ground Safety introduces the ‘Quest for Zero’ campaign to focus on risk management and on-duty safety. The campaign is designed for every Airman, in all career fields, to raise awareness of the hazards they face every day, at work and at home. “Readiness is paramount to...
 
 
(U.S. Air Force graphic by Naoko Shimoji) 

Cyber security: Our present, our future

Cyber technologies and the Internet are an integral part of everyone’s lives these days, whether at work, at home, on the go, for fun, to keep us healthy, manage our finances and even to save our lives. Most of our day-to-day...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin