Air Force

January 10, 2013

Air Force Tuition Assistance Program changes policy

Airman 1st Class Monet Villacorte
99th Air Base Wing Public Affairs

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev.  — The Air Force tuition assistance program changed its policies on Jan.3 to emphasize the importance of Airmen maintaining a 2.0 grade point average and a 3.0 for graduate level degrees.

“The tuition assistance program is set up to assist our Airmen in getting their degrees,” said Alice Patton, chief of education and training at Nellis Air Force Base. “With this program students will get $4,500 a year or up to $250 per semester hour.”

The new policies are set in place to ensure Airmen are focusing on school and are dedicated to further their education without misusing the program.

“The Air Force decided they were going to emphasize GPAs to help students maintain a C average,” said Patton. “Otherwise Airmen would just be wasting their time as well as Air Force funds.”

Policy changes include those pertaining to waivers, missing grades and maintaining a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher for undergraduates and a 3.0 for graduate levels.

“When they originally made the policy, waiver actions were common for people who had to withdraw from the class due to deployment, illness or failure,” Patton said. “For failure of a class the student would pay back the money for the class and the F would not be counted towards the GPA.”

“As of Jan. 3 the Air Force has reversed that policy and now we count all grades used with the TA program,” said Patton. “If any classes are failed for any reason the student must pay for those classes.”

“Students must also have all grades turned into the education office no later than 60 days after a class has ended to avoid paying out of pocket for the class,” added Patton.

Consequences for low GPAs and missing grades can be detrimental to an Airman’s education.

“Airmen must have a 2.0 GPA after 15 semester hours of coursework and continue to maintain it,” Patton said. “If it is not maintained, your records will be locked, tuition assistance will be denied and you will have to pay to take classes to bring your GPA up to a 2.0. After the GPA is brought back up, TA will be available to you again.”

Although these policy changes will be a new pace for Airmen trying to further their education, TA counselors are available to guide future students in the right direction.

“Apply early, get started in school and take the first class, because that’s the hardest part,” said Patton. “Come in to the education center and see us.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
FoodBank_pict

Commissary food bank donations top 4 million pounds

FORT LEE, Va. – In a classic case of a crisis creating an opportunity, the government shutdown of 2013 served as a catalyst to revive donations from military commissaries to local food banks, with the stores donating more tha...
 
 
DoD
Equality_pict

Women’s Equality Day commemorates history, bridges future leaders

WASHINGTON (AFNS) — Women’s Equality Day, Aug. 26, not only commemorates the ratification of the 95th anniversary of the 19th Amendment — which solidified women’s voting rights — but it also coincides with...
 
 
DoD
ArmyDepot

Army Depot explosion in Japan remains under investigation

WASHINGTON — The cause of an explosion and the resulting large fire at a storage building early today at the Army’s Sagami General Depot in Sagamihara City, Japan, remains under investigation, Pentagon spokesman Navy Capt....
 

 
AAFES_pict

Shopping the Exchange pays $224 million in dividends

DALLAS – The Army & Air Force Exchange Service paid a dividend of $224 million in 2014 to morale, welfare and recreation efforts for the Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy. In the past 10 years, the Exchange has prov...
 
 
3D_pict

To print a missile: Raytheon research points to 3-D printing for tomorrow’s technology

The day is coming when missiles can be printed.  Researchers at Raytheon Missile Systems say they have already created nearly every component of a guided weapon using additive manufacturing, more commonly known as 3-D printing...
 
 
U.S. Air Force photo/Scott M. Ash

AF Senior leaders give State of the Air Force address

WASHINGTON (AFNS) — Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James and Chief of Staff of the Air Force Gen. Mark A. Welsh III held a State of the Air Force address at the Pentagon, Aug. 24. The first topic of discussion w...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>