Air Force

April 26, 2013

The “Last One” departs

Tags:
Teresa Pittman
309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group Business Affairs

Eddie Caro, crew chief on F-4 Phantom tail number 68-0599, launches the final F-4 delivery to BAE Systems in Mojave, Calif., from Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. BAE Systems will convert the aircraft into a drone and eventually deliver the jet to Tyndall AFB, Fla.

The final F-4 regenerated from storage at the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group performed its last flight over Tucson, here, April 17, before heading to Mojave, Calif.

Aircraft 68-0599, an RF-4C Phantom, arrived at AMARG for storage on January 18, 1989 and had not flown since.

Mr. Eddie Caro, the crew chief assigned to the aircraft since December 2012, watched while the “Last One,” the jet’s call sign, taxied and launched from the D-M flightline.

Caro said he and the other maintenance professionals, who rebuilt the jet over the last year, were thrilled to watch the aircraft launch.

“It’s a great feeling to see such a magnificent aircraft fly again to serve the warfighter,” said Caro. “I have no doubt this jet will perform well as a full-scale aerial target. AMARG’s maintainers dedicated thousands of hours, not to mention some blood, sweat and tears to this aircraft.”

The Boneyard technicians re-installed hundreds of parts and performed thousands of hours of maintenance to return this jet back to flyable status. This aircraft represents the 316th F-4 withdrawn from storage in support of Air Combat Command’s full-scale aerial target program.

BAE Systems will convert the aircraft into a QRF-4C drone and eventually deliver the jet to Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.

The successful delivery of “Last One” represents a significant milestone in AMARG’s history and is a testament to AMARG’s maintenance and flight test teams.

AMARG will continue to support the FSAT program’s fourth generation of drones when they begin regeneration of the first F-16 Fighting Falcons for the drone program in June.




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