Commentary

May 30, 2013

What’s your Air Force relationship status?

Commentary by Chief Master Sgt. Tamala Hartz
97th Security Forces Squadron

ALTUS AIR FORCE BASE, Okla. (AFNS) — How are things between you and the Air Force these days? Would you say the two of you are in a committed relationship? Are you happy with the Air Force? Is the Air Force happy with you? Are either of you thinking of ending the relationship? These may sound like silly questions, but when you really think about it, your relationship with the Air Force is a lot like your relationships with friends and loved ones. A career in the Air Force will require work, maintenance and sacrifice similar to those efforts given to our personal associations.

Just like any extensive time spent with a person, extended time spent with the Air Force will mean a series of good times and not-so-good times. There will be times when you’ll wonder why you’re in this relationship, and there will be times when you can’t imagine yourself without the Air Force. Like all other relationships, the Air Force will give and take. A few of the great opportunities you have in the Air Force that you may not find in civilian companies include: the sense of being part of an organization bigger than yourself, travel, fair promotion opportunities, competitive pay and benefits, protection from unfair work practices, and other quality of life options for you and your family. Just like in other relationships, in order to have the great things you must make some sacrifices. Throughout your career, you will be afforded the opportunity to work long hours, take multiple deployments, go on remote assignments, and be exposed to harsh work environments. It’s going to mean understanding your time in the Air Force as a process of give and take, just like you do in any successful relationship.

When you think about the key components in a successful long term relationship you’ll find it requires strength of character, putting the other person’s needs before yours, and a predominant desire for exceptionalism that makes you unique to a person. Does any of that sound familiar? It should. It basically means integrity first, service before self, and excellence in all you do. When you swore your oath of allegiance to enter the Air Force you essentially changed your relationship status to reflect a committed relationship to the Air Force and these are the requirements of that relationship.

As we move forward through challenges and endeavors, work on and treat your career as you would a relationship with a friend or loved one. Some days it will seem like you are facing the most difficult times of your life, and other times you will feel like you are truly living the best days of your life. At the end of a career whether it is four or thirty years, I hope your relationship with the Air Force is a positive one that improved your life and you as a person. Thank you, for what you do every day.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Postpartum_pict

Commentary: Changes to the Air Force’s post-partum policies

UNITED KINGDOM – On July 8, I received an e-mail informing me that I was within 90 days of my deployment window. My first reaction was, “Great, I have to do a ton of CBTs.”[computer-based training]. I quickly realized...
 
 
MissHome_pict

“I know you don’t want me to, but I miss home”

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. — Pixar’s movie “Inside Out” is a movie every military family should see. I say family because it is not just for kids. Although it is an animated film, its themes are n...
 
 
Family_pict

The power of family

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho — As the saying goes, “the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree,” Tech. Sgt. Matthew Turner, NCO in charge of the 391st Fighter Squadron medical element, grew up und...
 

 
U.S. Air Force photo / Senior Airman Amelia Leonard

Communication: So what you’re saying is …?

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Arizona — “Genuine leaders have the ability to articulate, initiate and follow-through on their vision.” ~ Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This quote from King epitomizes the importance of de...
 
 

Legal Corner: Avoiding ‘bird-dogging’

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, Va. — Scams aimed at taking advantage of U.S. military members are nothing new; however, one such scam, “bird-dogging,” has re-emerged as a threat to Service members’ financial security. Bird-dogging refers to the act of soliciting sales for a third party and is illegal both on and off base. One example occurs when a...
 
 

Air Force needs every Airman as leader

TRAVIS AIR FORCE, Calif.  — Does every Airman truly need to be a leader?  The short answer is yes. Obviously, there are various levels of leadership within the Air Force, but even an airman basic is a leader in the community by virtue of wearing the uniform. The civilian population looks to members of the uniformed services...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>