Commentary

July 5, 2013

Independence Day: Freedom at its finest

Staff Sgt. Amanda Dick
Air Force Public Affairs Agency

SAN ANTONIO, Texas (AFNS) — In a few days, we, as Americans, will celebrate one of the most, if not the most, important date for the U.S. — our Independence Day.

As I try to figure out what I’ll be doing for the Fourth of July weekend, I also want to take the time to reflect on this most reverent of days.

What does Independence Day represent to me?

I mean, we’ve all been taught in school what led to our independence and how we achieved it, but what does it really stand for?

For me, Independence Day is more than just a day America gained its freedom. I learned from my Grandpa Randall, who loved to research our family heritage, that my family is deeply rooted in American soil.

The Randall side of the family emigrated from England on one of the first boats to the U.S. Our family is related to President Ulysses S. Grant, and one of our ancestors fought alongside President George Washington in Valley Forge. My family settled and fought for America’s independence, and for me, it’s pretty inspiring to know I have those roots.

However, that’s the beauty of being an American. It doesn’t matter if your roots are 237 years old or just a few days, we can all take pride in America and celebrate its independence.

One of the main reasons I joined the Air Force was because I wanted to follow in my father’s footsteps and serve my country to earn my place next to those who have served before.

While it’s not always fun or easy being in the military, I enjoy living the Air Force way of life. It’s truly amazing to know I’m a part of something bigger than myself.

For those times more difficult than others, however, I think on my family and friends. Those are the people who get me through the hard days. Those are the faces I will bring to mind while downrange. Those are the people whose lives I personally protect while protecting America, so that July 4th will always remain their Independence Day.

This Fourth of July, I want to remember those who paid the sacrifice for America to gain its freedom. While we enjoy the company of our family and friends this Fourth of July weekend, we should remember that our nation was built on blood, sweat and tears.

Blood: The blood of those who paid the ultimate sacrifice for America’s freedom, such as Army Private 1st Class James Arnold, who was killed in the Vietnam War. Though I didn’t personally know Private Arnold, as I reflect on the reason his name is on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall in Washington, I am truly grateful and indebted to him for his sacrifice to this great country.

Sweat: The sweat of those who have worked hard to make America what it is today, such as the immigrants who toiled and labored to become citizens or the settlers who moved west to create a life for themselves.

Tears: The tears of those who mourn for the ones lost to gain America’s freedom, such as the family of Master Sgt. Tara Brown, who recently paid the ultimate price during Operation Enduring Freedom. Again, I don’t know Sergeant Brown, but I sympathize with her family and the families of the 6,000 military members who have died during Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom. I am thankful for all they gave to help keep America free.

So, enjoy the fireworks, enjoy the food, enjoy the company, but also remember to enjoy the independence and freedom we have and take the time to reflect on what those two words mean to you.

On this Independence Day, remember we have freedom at its finest, but not without a price.




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