Health & Safety

July 18, 2013

D-M’s Antiterrorism office

Tags:
Senior Airman Christine Griffiths
355th Fighter Wing Public Affairs
(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christine Griffiths)
Air Force Civilian Miguel Mendez, 355th Fighter Wing Antiterrorism program manager conducts assessment of an area on Davis-Monthan, July 1.

Terrorism is an act meant to threaten and instill fear in people or societies. Many do not recognize warning signs or even know what to do in order to prevent an attack.

The 355th Fighter Wing Antiterrorism office offers level-one Total Force Protection training, which provides general awareness. Airmen learn everything from dealing with an active shooter to historic incident’s associated with terrorism.

The 355th FW AT office is a liaison to those on and off base in providing safety and security every day.

“Antiterrorism and Force Protection isn’t just my duty,” said Miguel Mendez, 355th FW AT program manager. “It’s also the responsibility of every member of the Desert Lightning Team.”

Mendez helps the D-M community prevent and protect itself against a possible terrorist attack through ways of communication.

“There is no typical day here at D-M due to our mission, tenants and real world events,” Mendez said. “As the manager, I develop defensive measures that will be used to reduce the vulnerability of individuals and property to terrorist acts, facilitate a collective, proactive effort focused on the detection and prevention of terrorist attacks against D-M.”

During big events held on base, Mendez conducts assessments of the events and coordinates with members of the base to ensure everything is safe and enjoyable.

“I work with all agencies on base to include tenant units and provide AT services tailored to meet their needs,” Mendez said. “By working together with all base unit, together we form a stronger AT awareness posture ensuring the safety or our Airmen on D-M.”

Members of the DLT can also get involved in preventing terrorism by using the Eagle Eyes program. Members of the U.S. Air Force community can call a 24-hour phone number to report suspicious activity. If an individual is being followed or being solicited for information, call 228-8888.

Anyone can also report suspicious activity 24 hours a day to the 355th Security Forces Squadron base defense operation center at 228-3200, anytime, anywhere.

“The best weapon against terrorism is awareness and reporting,” Mendez said.

For any questions regarding the Antiterrorism and Force Protection program or if supervisors would like a briefing at a commander’s call, contact Mendez at 228-0027.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Pharmacy_pict

TRICARE Pharmacy Rules Changing for Maintenance, Brand-name Drugs

WASHINGTON — TRICARE beneficiaries who take certain brand-name medications on a regular basis will be required to fill prescriptions at a military treatment facility or through a mail-in program beginning Oct. 1, a Defense H...
 
 
U.S. Air Force Photo by 1st Lt. Jose R. Davis

Paving the way for Battlefield Airmen

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, Texas — *Editors note-The following is a commentary by a female who completed a Physical Fitness Tests and Standards study at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas. The Airman was a volun...
 
 
ToothHealth_pict

Bite down on summer tooth health

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Arizona — As you may know, during the summer it can be extremely hot.  We want to stay cool and keep hydrated; however, sometimes we can harm our teeth in the process. For example, chewing on ice o...
 

 
SunSafety_pict

Sun safety now pays dividend later

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Arizona — Having fun in the sun is great while at the the beach, river, hiking and other outdoor activities, but too much exposure and not enough protection can lead to sunburn. Sun damage can lead ...
 
 
Motorcycle_pict

Keep motorcycle riding fun – keep it safe

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Arizona — Many motorcyclists dream of riding during the summer, but without the right training it can quickly turn into a nightmare. “The cause of most motorcycle injuries we see are caused by lac...
 
 

Ten surprising ways GPS improves your life

In the 20 years since the U.S. Air Force first developed the satellite-based Global Positioning System (better known as GPS), its use as a free public utility has skyrocketed. For most of us, “GPS” is that screen in our car or that app on our smartphone that helps calculate drive times, avoid traffic jams, locate...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>