U.S.

July 18, 2013

F-16s being regenerated into drones

Tags:
Teresa Pittman
309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group
(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christine Griffiths)
Air Force civilians Robert Bliven and Andrew Bakios, 567th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Squadron perform maintenance on the first QF-16 being regenerated at the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group here July 9.

Less than three months after the last F-4 phantom II departed from the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group for drone conversion, maintainers here are already turning the wrenches on Air Combat Command’s fourth generation of aerial targets, the F-16 Fighting Falcon.

With AMARG’s entire F-16 regeneration team gathered to document the event on July 1, Col. Robert Lepper, AMARG Commander, took the opportunity to congratulate workers for being ready and prepared to transition so quickly from the F-4 to the F-16.

“Each and every one of you is significantly contributing to the future success of our fifth generation fighters,” Colonel Lepper said. “By preparing and delivering these modern, more agile F-16s, they’re providing a more realistic training environment for our warfighters.”

The first aircraft officially inducted into the full-scale aerial target regeneration program here is the F-16C, serial no. 85-1455 it is also the first aircraft to occupy space in

“Hangar One” since process improvement and time-saving modifications were completed in the building.

Air Force civilians Lonnie Thomas and Andrew Bakios, 567th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Squadron perform maintenance on one of six fuel tanks on the QF-16 at the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group.

Anticipating the QF-16 program’s requirement for AMARG to regenerate and deliver 210 F-16s on time, the newly painted hangar floors will be marked and tailored for five of the smaller (maximum capacity) jets versus four of the 1960-era Phantoms. AMARG will have the capacity to produce 22 F-16s per year.

According to Rob McNichol, the F-16 regeneration program’s supervisor assigned to the 576th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Squadron, the hangar’s added mezzanine is for the storage of parts that will be removed from the aircraft during maintenance.

“The aircraft will undergo an extensive maintenance program to ensure flight safety,” McNichol said. “Panels and avionic boxes will be removed, and the additional area off the maintenance floor will allow us to store the parts for quick and easy access.”

The F-16s destined for the drone program have been in storage from three to 12 years they will complete all time compliance technical orders required for test flights during maintenance activities.

It is slated to take approximately six months, or 180 calendar days, to produce an F-16 for delivery to Cecil Field in Jacksonville, Fla., where Boeing will install the QF-16 drone modification package.

Boeing was awarded the QF-16 full-scale aerial target engineering, manufacturing and development contract in 2010 and delivered their first QF-16 to the 53rd Weapons Evaluation Group for testing at Tyndall AFB, Fla., in November.

The F-16 regeneration program is anticipated to continue at AMARG through fiscal year 2021.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Exchange keeps the ‘Thanks’ in Thanksgiving

DALLAS – With a quarter of its work force comprised of military family members, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service is a true example of family serving family. As such, the focus on Thanksgiving will be on family. “Exchange Main Stores in the Continental United States will be closed Thanksgiving, but open early Black...
 
 

Local Civil Air Patrol opportunities available

There is a unique organization available for those who are interested in serving the U.S. without contractual obligation. The Civil Air Patrol was created in 1941, giving thousands of volunteer members the chance to answer America’s call to national service by accepting and performing critical wartime missions. Today the CAP supports America’s communities with emergency...
 
 

Key Spouse program supports military families

COLUMBUS AIR FORCE BASE, Miss. — Keeping deployed members’ spouses involved and in the loop can be difficult for commanders and first sergeants to keep up. The key spouse program exists to make sure families are taken care of. “The key spouse program mission is based on readiness, retention and resiliency,” said Carmine Muscarella, Airman and Family...
 

 
(U.S. Air Force photo by: Staff Sgt. Angela Ruiz)

355th CES spread the “I am energy” campaign

October is Energy Action Month throughout the federal government and in the U.S. Air Force. Airmen, here, educated themselves and future generations on base and in the local community about the importance of saving energy. This...
 
 

Online vigilance reduces risk

MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. – I received at least five emails last week warning me to secure my social media settings and be aware of what I post on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Why? Do you not like to see what I had for dinner last night? Too many #selfies? Are photos of my dog eating...
 
 

Military Tuition Assistance Program implements changes for FY15

HOLLOMAN AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. — Air Force active duty Airmen who want to take advantage of the military assistance programs for voluntary education in the coming academic year can expect several changes that were implemented on Oct. 1, 2014. The new Air Force Credentialing Opportunities Online, also referred to as AF COOL, will take the place...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin