U.S.

July 18, 2013

FY13 Technical sergeant-selects not eligible for NCORP Phase II

Senior Airman Timothy Moore
355th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

With the June 27 public release of technical sergeant selections, the Total Force Service Center has seen an increase of calls from technical sergeant-selects concerned about being selected for non-voluntary retraining as part of the Noncommissioned Officer Retraining Program Phase II.

However, they are not eligible for non-voluntary selection.

The NCORP is a two-phase program used to balance and sustain enlisted force members by moving second-term and career Airmen from overmanned career fields to undermanned ones.

Phase I allows Airmen, qualified staff sergeant-selects through master sergeants, to volunteer to retrain into an undermanned career field of their choice.

On the other hand, Phase II selects qualified Airmen for non-voluntary retraining. Phase II is implemented when Phase I objectives are not met.

Airmen that meet retraining eligibility requirements and are vulnerable for non-voluntary retraining are notified by their local personnel section in July.

In order to qualify for selection in either phase, retraining applicants must be a second-term or career Airman, have at least a projected rank of staff sergeant through master sergeant, have a minimum 5-skill level in their control Air Force Specialty Code and have at least 24 months of retainability after completion of their new career field’s technical school.

In addition, staff sergeants must have fewer than 12 years of active service as of Sept. 30, and technical and master sergeants can have no more than 16 years of active service by the same date.

The fiscal year 2014 NCORP Phase I ended on July 7. Phase II began on July 8, and is scheduled to end Sept. 8.

The technical sergeant-selects, which were announced on the June 27 release, were able to apply for retraining during Phase I if they met the criteria. However, they will not be selected for non-voluntary retraining during Phase II.




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(U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Chris Massey)

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