Air Force

August 8, 2013

Second job entails procedures, approval

Senior Airman Kate Vaughn
56th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. – Unexpected events in life such as family issues, education needs and even career progression can make getting a second job helpful for active-duty Airmen.

However, if an Airman seeks off-duty employment, certain protocol must be adhered to. Factors such as upgrade training, upcoming deployments and duty performance can effect whether or not an Airman receives off-duty employment approval.

The Defense Department Regulation 5500.7-R, Joint Ethics Regulation, Section 2-206a, outlines specific guidelines military members must follow when seeking off-duty employment.

It states, “Approval shall be granted unless a determination is made that the business activity or compensated outside employment is expected to involve conduct prohibited by statute or regulation.”

Master Sgt. Renee Huggins, 56th Fighter Wing staff agencies first sergeant, said Airmen should carefully consider whether or not a second job is the right choice.

“Airmen should think about how a second job is going to affect their ability to perform the daily mission in the Air Force,” Huggins said. “A second job can be exhausting, and it could lead to them not performing at the optimum level, which could have a negative mission impact.”

Air Force Instruction 44-102, Medical Care Management, states, “A period of at least six hours of rest must elapse between the end of the off-duty employment and the start of the duty period.”

Distance and time of travel can also be a contributing factor in off-duty job approval, according to the AFI.

“Military personnel may only work at a site that is close enough to allow the individual to return promptly if military duty requires their return. For off-duty employment during non-duty hours of normal duty days, providers must be able to return within two hours by land.”

Completion of an AFIMT 3902, Application and Approval for Off-duty Employment, is mandatory for Airmen to begin working while off duty. The form includes a section for Airman to agree to conduct themselves in a credible manner while working at their second job.

The form must be signed by the Airman’s supervisor, staff judge advocate office and unit commander.




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(U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Brett Clashman)

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