Air Force

August 15, 2013

Air Force looks to fill developmental special duties

Airman 1st Class Josh Slavin
355th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

The Air Force has recently identified 10 special duties as enlisted developmental positions that need all openings occupied. This gives commanders the opportunity to nominate their top Airmen to their respective major commands.

The special duties will be filled by the most qualified staff sergeants, technical sergeants and master sergeants. The list of developmental special duties consists of Technical Training Instructor in core Air Force Specialty Codes; Career Assistance Advisor; Military Training Instructor; Military Training Leader; United States Air Force Academy Military Training; Airman and Family Readiness Center non-commissioned officer; First Sergeant; United States Air Force Honor Guard; Recruiter and Professional Military Education Instructor.

“This forces us to take another look at our Airmen and really realize what we’re here to do,” said Chief Master Sgt. Dawna Cnota, 355th Fighter Wing command chief. “Really realize how important the mentorship and these special duty opportunities are for the personal and professional development of our Airmen.”

All career fields will be nominating their top Airmen, with the possible exception of critically manned jobs.

For Airmen who are hoping to be nominated, they must first meet the following criteria:

· Staff sergeants, technical sergeants or master sergeants including selects with four or more years from their current or projected grade high-year tenure

· Skill level required for current grade

· Overall enlisted performance report rating of five on last three performance reports

· Must have scored 80 or above on last two fitness tests, or above a 90 on most recent test; no failures on any portion within the last 12 months or exemptions from any component

· No record of disciplinary action that resulted in an Article 15 or Unfavorable Information File for the past three years

· Have a Community College of the Air Force degree, or be within 12 months of completion

“We have a lot of great Airmen out there that would probably be great at these AFSC’s, but are nervous or afraid of making that decision,” Cnota said. “Sometimes, they need a bit of a nudge.”

The nomination process will take place twice a year, during March and September. Airmen who are currently serving in a special duty assignment, or have recently finished one must go back to their original AFSC for four years before they can be selected again.




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