Commentary

August 15, 2013

“Our” Airman’s Creed

Commentary by Master Sgt. David A. Kolcun
7th Maintenance Group

DYESS AIR FORCE BASE, Texas — Gen. T. Michael Moseley, the 18th Chief of Staff of the Air Force, introduced the Airman’s Creed on April 18, 2007. It provides Airmen a tangible statement of beliefs that we cherish. The Airman’s Creed was not created to regain some ideal that was lost or never otherwise identified, rather, it was created to focus on and recognize a spirit that transcends time from the past, to the present and into the future.

The Airman’s Creed echoes pride in the role of air, space, and cyberspace power and the Air Force’s commitment in supporting and defending the nation. The creed is fueled by the Air Force’s heritage and a warfighting character that exists in all Airmen. I believe the “Airman’s Creed” serves as a vocal reminder of our spectacular combat heritage. Airmen of the past paved the runway for the Air Force warriors of the future. This creed articulates our storied past while providing a glimpse into our future. Airmen in the U.S. Air Force are the heart and soul of our unique fighting force and the creed captures that. It recognizes our historic achievements and signifies our unique contributions to fighting and winning America’s wars.

The Airman’s Creed, in its simplest form, is an obvious representation of what it means to be an Airman. It highlights the warrior spirit that is instilled in us from day-one of Basic Military Training. It sets forth a belief that Airmen are defenders of the American people and of freedom and justice all over the world. The creed summarizes an Airman’s responsibility to this nation, our mission in its defense, our unwavering dedication to the profession of arms and our undying loyalty to our fellow Airmen. The creed plainly and succinctly puts into words the warfighting spirit that exists in Airmen past and present. Our creed outlines the service’s core principle to fly, fight and win our nation’s wars.

We, as Airmen, embrace the notion that the Air Force is a combatant organization; the warrior philosophy abounds. The creed displays our warfighting ethos. Having a warfighting ethos is part of the Air Force’s soul, its makeup. It is woven into every flag draped upon an Airman’s coffin, it is present in every 21 gun salute performed at an Air Force funeral and it is displayed in every “missing man” formation flown by an Air Force aircraft. Our role in the fight is not simply support and the creed details this point. Airmen are spilling blood, sweat, and tears, and it comes at a great price. The creed captures our contribution to the overall security of this nation and our importance in the fight. It outlines my acceptance to bear the responsibility of upholding a legacy of valor while simultaneously forging a way ahead for others to follow.

The Airman’s Creed encapsulates what it means to be an Airman, to have pride in service and instills ownership of a warrior organization. This creed is about our people and a military service that is fundamentally different than any other service. The Airman’s Creed is about who we are, where we’ve come from and where we are going. It is about the pride we have as Airmen. It represents our word to remain dedicated to the American people as we have for many years. It is our word to stand by them and protect them no matter the cost. It is our word to do what is right. And after all, our word is our bond!




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Becoming stronger through failure

ELLSWORTH AIR FORCE BASE, S.D.  — Failing the Air Force physical training test: my greatest fear since joining the military. It is embarrassing to admit recently that fear came to fruition, but what I have learned through that failure has become one of my greatest strengths. After failing, I definitely felt like a weak person for not...
 
 

Students wear red, white and blue to honor Month of the Military Child

(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Cheyenne Morigeau) Students of Borman Elementary School gather together for a flag raising ceremony and wear red, white and blue clothing to honor the Month of the Military Child at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, April 10. During the ceremony, the children listened to guest speakers, recited the...
 
 

Case lot sale returns to D-M April 17-19

FORT LEE, Va. – Mention case lot sales and commissary patrons start lining up for the opportunity to save up to 50 percent or more on club-pack and full-case items. Known as the Commissary Customer Appreciation Case Lot Sale, the springtime version of this twice-yearly event will unfold at stateside stores, each hosting their individual...
 

 
(U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Airman 1st Class Jessica H. Smith and Airman Connor J. Marth)

More than meets the eye

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho — The word abuse often conjures images of bruises, swollen lips and harsh markings, but abuse is more than meets the eye. It can be much more than physical suffering and can have last...
 
 
(Courtesy photo)

AFSOUTH working with Colombia to develop space program

American Airmen from the Space community traveled to multiple U.S. space operations locations with Colombian air force counterparts in February as part of a U.S. Southern Command subject matter expert exchange. According to Lt....
 
 

Local Briefs April 17, 2015

NARFE Chapter 55 to meet  April 13, 11 a.m. – Golden Corral The National Active and Retired Federal Employees (NARFE) Association, Chapter 55, will hold their next monthly luncheon meeting on Monday April 13 at the Golden Corral, 4380 East 22nd Street, Tucson, AZ 85711. The luncheon starts at 11 a.m. and ends about 1:30...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin