Commentary

September 26, 2013

Dagger Point: A First Sergeant’s point of view

Staff Sgt. Adam Grant
12th Air Force (Air Forces Southern) Public Affairs

Master Sgt. Angela Womack is the 12th Air Force (Air Forces Southern) First Sergeant. She began her 18-year career as an Aerospace Medical Technician. In addition to holding a variety of positions in the medical career field, she has also served as the Professional Military Education Instructor for Airman Leadership School and the Family Readiness non-commissioned officer-in-charge for Wright-Patterson AFB. She became a First Sergeant in 2010 and arrived here in July after completing a short-tour at Kunsan AB, South Korea as the First Sergeant for the 8th Maintenance Squadron.

Question: What do you like about being a Numbered Air Force (NAF) First Sergeant, and how is it different from squadron life? 

Womack: It’s a great job I couldn’t have asked for a better one. The main difference I’ve noticed is that at the NAF you’re able to see the mission being executed from a different vantage point. You’re able to see some of the things that go into mission that you don’t get to see at the squadron level. 

Question: What advice do you give to all of your new inbound personnel?

Womack: Make the most out of your assignment and the position that you’ve been placed in. You have the opportunity to absorb all of the knowledge and expertise of the leaders around you. And, finally…become the change that you wish to see in the Air Force by setting an example on and off-duty. 

Question: What is a pet peeve of yours?

Womack: I would say a lack of accountability and a lack of honesty. Both of these lead to a lack of both trust and faith.

Question: As the Air Force continues to slim down what advice would you give to Airmen on staying competitive and being marketable to the Air Force?

Womack: I would tell Airmen to stay informed of the opportunities out there and don’t be afraid to apply for positions that become available. Set goals and always look toward the future. Always remember that no one cares about your career more than you do yourself. 

Question: What has been your most rewarding assignment? And, why?

Womack: Every assignment is your best assignment, but I haven’t been here very long so I would say that it’s been serving at Kunsan AB, South Korea. To be able to see Airmen who are away from their families come together as one to execute the mission made this assignment very rewarding for me. 

Question: What is the most rewarding part of being a First Sergeant?

Womack: Having the opportunity to help Airmen and their families with situations and being able to see the impact I’ve made on them. At a previous base, one of the sections went out as an office for lunch and returned and noticed that one of the Airmen was acting very strange (which was very different behavior for this Airmen). They then noticed that this Airman was missing and had not been seen for awhile, after a search for the Airmen they located him while he was attempting to harm himself. I was able to intervene and be there with the Airman as he received medical attention as well as during his journey to reintegration into the work place.




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