Commentary

September 26, 2013

Dagger Point: A First Sergeant’s point of view

Staff Sgt. Adam Grant
12th Air Force (Air Forces Southern) Public Affairs

Master Sgt. Angela Womack is the 12th Air Force (Air Forces Southern) First Sergeant. She began her 18-year career as an Aerospace Medical Technician. In addition to holding a variety of positions in the medical career field, she has also served as the Professional Military Education Instructor for Airman Leadership School and the Family Readiness non-commissioned officer-in-charge for Wright-Patterson AFB. She became a First Sergeant in 2010 and arrived here in July after completing a short-tour at Kunsan AB, South Korea as the First Sergeant for the 8th Maintenance Squadron.

Question: What do you like about being a Numbered Air Force (NAF) First Sergeant, and how is it different from squadron life? 

Womack: It’s a great job I couldn’t have asked for a better one. The main difference I’ve noticed is that at the NAF you’re able to see the mission being executed from a different vantage point. You’re able to see some of the things that go into mission that you don’t get to see at the squadron level. 

Question: What advice do you give to all of your new inbound personnel?

Womack: Make the most out of your assignment and the position that you’ve been placed in. You have the opportunity to absorb all of the knowledge and expertise of the leaders around you. And, finally…become the change that you wish to see in the Air Force by setting an example on and off-duty. 

Question: What is a pet peeve of yours?

Womack: I would say a lack of accountability and a lack of honesty. Both of these lead to a lack of both trust and faith.

Question: As the Air Force continues to slim down what advice would you give to Airmen on staying competitive and being marketable to the Air Force?

Womack: I would tell Airmen to stay informed of the opportunities out there and don’t be afraid to apply for positions that become available. Set goals and always look toward the future. Always remember that no one cares about your career more than you do yourself. 

Question: What has been your most rewarding assignment? And, why?

Womack: Every assignment is your best assignment, but I haven’t been here very long so I would say that it’s been serving at Kunsan AB, South Korea. To be able to see Airmen who are away from their families come together as one to execute the mission made this assignment very rewarding for me. 

Question: What is the most rewarding part of being a First Sergeant?

Womack: Having the opportunity to help Airmen and their families with situations and being able to see the impact I’ve made on them. At a previous base, one of the sections went out as an office for lunch and returned and noticed that one of the Airmen was acting very strange (which was very different behavior for this Airmen). They then noticed that this Airman was missing and had not been seen for awhile, after a search for the Airmen they located him while he was attempting to harm himself. I was able to intervene and be there with the Airman as he received medical attention as well as during his journey to reintegration into the work place.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Professionalism, mission focus, and a new way forward for base inspections

Professionalism, mission focus, and a new way forward known as the Air Force Inspection System – those three things sum up what members of the Desert Lightning Team should take away from last week’s Unit Effectiveness Inspection. The Air Combat Command Inspector General Team conducted the 355th Fighter Wing’s Capstone event, known as a UEI,...
 
 
(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christopher Reel)

The last bite

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. – Shake, take, salute and pose for a photo–Tyndall’s 2014 March Enlisted Promotion Ceremony was carrying on as usual. I raised my camera, waited for the grip and grin moment and then...
 
 

When keeping it real goes wrong

It’s Tuesday, and after a long day at work I’m reminded that I have an intramural league basketball game tonight. After arriving home and quickly changing I make my way back to the base gym to avoid the scrutiny of my coach and team mates.  As I begin to search through the maze of a...
 

 
email-pic

The impact of a simple email

It’s been a long day. I’m tired, worn out. It seems like the emails just won’t stop. Review this, update that, and the ever dreaded tasking that was due yesterday. One after another they attack my sanity, chipping away a ...
 
 

Leadership stresses importance of keeping families informed

The Air Force’s on-going force shaping initiatives affect more than our Airmen–they also affect our families.  The concerns and questions Air Force families differ from those of a service member. Family members have few opportunities to engage with commanders and experts and large auditorium briefings and pages of personnel documents are not always the most...
 
 
computer-hands

Think before you act: It only takes a second for your actions to go viral

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, Texas – Have you ever done something you wish you could take back? Said something mean … wrote something inappropriate … behaved in a way that was disrespectful? I’m sure y...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin