Health & Safety

September 26, 2013

Random Anti-Terrorism Measures come to D-M

Senior Airmen Camilla Elizeu
355th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

What do you do if you see suspicious activity or packages?

Miguel Mendez, 355th Fighter Wing Anti-Terrorism Officer, is putting the Desert Lightning Team to the test with a program called Random Anti-Terrorism Measures.

RAMs are just that, random inspections of various facilities from the anti-terrorism perspective and are designed to increase base personnel’s vigilance to prevent loss of life and damage to government property.

The purpose is to raise awareness around base and increase base personnel’s vigilance to prevent loss of life and damage to government property.

“RAMs can be anything,” said Mendez. “The key point of the RAMs is awareness.”

Every month Mendez picks a handful of random locations to conduct a RAM inspection.

“RAMs can be anything but can easily be defeated if individuals are not aware,” said Mendez. “No terrorist is going to tell you what they are planning to do. RAMs can cause the terrorist to start their planning process over, abandon their original plan or choose another area to target.”

RAMs plus awareness plus people equals finding R-I-C-K, the terrorist. It is a people formula not a scientific formula.

R- Recover from a terrorist attack and prevent a secondary terrorist attack.

I- Incapacitate and/or incarcerate those individuals who are pursuing a terrorist agenda prior to major loss of life occurs.

C- Capture all individuals involved in a terrorist attack by leveraging the support of local communities and the international community.

K- Kill, in time of war or conflict and in peace time prevent further loss of life DMAFB and the Tucson Community.

The anti-terrorism office wants you to be in the right mindset and have the right attitude when it comes to completing these RAMs. They want you to treat them like they are real-world situations.

Wing leadership is prepared to show their appreciation for those who react appropriately to these scenarios. The anti-terrorism office is authorized to give day passes to the individuals who respond accordingly.

Remember remain vigilant, don’t hesitate, report who, what, where, when, numbers and how to the law enforcement desk at 228-3200.




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