Air Force

October 24, 2013

Enlisted EPME course return policy explained

Tech. Sgt. Lesley Waters
Air Force Public Affairs Agency

WASHINGTON (AFNS) — The Air Force is giving three options to Airmen who were sent back to their home station while in the process of completing their respective Enlisted Professional Military Education course, as a result of the government shutdown.

For the 900 affected Airmen who were attending Airman Leadership School or Noncommissioned Officer Academy in-residence PME, the Air Force has developed three courses of action for them, which would allow for them to accomplish credit of their perspective PME.

“In an effort to balance the vital development of our enlisted corps, while considering the turmoil the early return caused each of our members, the personnel community has approved three options for each Airman affected,” said Chief Master Sgt. William Ward, the Enlisted Developmental Education chief.

Under the first option, Airmen who returned before completing academic requirements can elect to attend the full in-residence course. The Air Force Personnel Center will reschedule Airmen during Fiscal 2014 using normal selection criteria.

As part of the second option, Airmen will have the choice to enroll in the available EPME Distance Learning course to satisfy all EPME requirements.  Students who choose the DL option must enroll within 30 days of notification by AFPC and will be required to complete the course within 12 months of enrollment.

The final option is for members who completed at least 50 percent of the required academic days (i.e. 14 for NCO Academy and 12 for ALS) can choose to return and resume their respective EPME course at the point which they departed.  AFPC will make every attempt to schedule these Airmen at the earliest possible date.

“Regardless of which of the three options selected, Airmen will be given full EPME credit as if they had attended and completed the full in-residence course,” Ward said.

Air Force Personnel Center will contact each Airman who returned to home station and explain the options available and determine their preference of the three options available to them.




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(U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Chris Massey)

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