Commentary

November 14, 2013

Standards don’t change – on duty or off

Commentary by Senior Airman Shannon Hall
7th Bomb Wing public Affairs

DYESS AIR FORCE BASE, Texas — Integrity first, service before self and excellence in all we do are core values that U.S. Air Force Airmen live by. Although these are important values for the Air Force, every base has their own principles that are essential to accomplishing the mission.

Brig. Gen. Glen VanHerck, 7th Bomb Wing commander, has many priorities for Team Dyess, but pride, professionalism, policies and procedures are what he would like to see Airmen incorporating into their everyday lives.

“Everywhere I go, I am always under the microscope, whether it’s on base or downtown,” VanHerck said. “Therefore, I instill the meanings of these words into my way of life every single day and I expect the same from our Airmen.”

By incorporating these principles into daily work routines Airmen can ensure they excel in all that they do, which ties into the Air Force core values.

“I think the general brought these to our attention because one is meaningless without the others,” said Airman 1st Class Pesamino Mikaele, 7th Operations Support Squadron. “They all assist each other in helping Airmen cover the big picture of creating one of the top operative bases.”

Although all four principles play an important role into accomplishing the mission, sometimes there is one that stands out more, whether it’s because it needs more work or that Airmen are overly succeeding at it.

“Professionalism is the most important to me,” said Senior Airman Damon Carroll, 7th Force Support Squadron. “We stand for the United States Air Force as a whole and the way one person is portrayed could tarnish the image of the entire Air Force.”

“I would like to see more pride in the unit, in our country, our service and our base,” VanHerck said. “Showing pride leads to dedication, teamwork and gets away from the individual aspect of everything. I feel our Airmen are achieving these principles, but there is always room for improvement.”

It is every Airman’s responsibility to hold his or her self, and each other accountable, to ensure their uniforms are within regulations, jobs are being completed correctly and in a timely manner, rules are being followed on and off base, and that necessary tasks and training are being accomplished in every unit. Don’t be afraid to take the initiative and let Airmen know when they are in the wrong.

Airmen keep the base operational and pride can be reflected in that.

“Make sure the image of our base is being maintained by picking up any trash and handling small landscaping jobs around the squadrons,” Carroll said.

Everyone in the Air Force makes one team and can be in the spotlight at any time, this alone makes professionalism important.

“When interacting with others on or off base, and no matter the rank, be professional and always remember your customs and courtesies,” Mikaele said.

Following policies and procedures correctly can save the Air Force time and money.

“Knowing what is right and wrong and what policies and procedures are specifically governed for your job is important,” Carroll said. “Everything needs to be done correctly, in a timely manner on the first attempt to save time and keep us from spending money to fix little problems.”

“Having pride, being professional and following policies and procedures all play a key role in the success of today’s military,” Mikaele said. “Without these aspects we are not as strong as we could be. They make us try harder with the satisfaction of completing something that benefits a greater cause. What we are striving for is bigger than any individual and living by these principles reminds us of that every day.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

The new fight: Writing cyber into the science of war

Every year, the Aspen Security Forum brings together the top minds in defense, intelligence and homeland security. This year, more than ever, the conversation is turning to cybersecurity – protecting computer networks and everything attached to them. Cyber is constantly changing the way conflicts and combat unfold. Here, former U.S. Navy Rear Adm. William Leigher offers insights...
 
 
(U.S. Air Force photo/Osakabe Yasuo)

Need help? Trust your ‘Shirt’

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Arizona — When young Airmen need help or are looking for guidance, a good place to start is with a senior NCO. Making it into the top 3 percent in the U.S. Air Force is a major accomplishment. Alt...
 
 

Local Briefs July 31, 2015

Sunset Horseback Ride August 8, 4 – 8 p.m. – Outdoor Rec Saddle up and enjoy a 2-hour sunset horseback ride through the Saguaro National Park.. Final deadline for sign-ups is July 31. Minimum age: 18. Cost of $25/person. Call 228-3736 for more information. White water rafting and camping Aug. 20 – 24 – Grand...
 

 
(Courtesy Photo)

A Q&A with Master Sgt. Jaime Lewis

The men and women of the 12th Air Force (Air Forces Southern) welcomed a new First Sgt. in May. Master Sgt. Jaime M. Lewis, began his career in 2000 as an Aerial Porter, where he performed duties such as passenger services, car...
 
 
(U.S. Air Force photo/ Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen)

Relationship building by means of the F-16

  America’s stars and stripes and Arizona’s lone copper star always wave proudly at the Arizona Air National Guard’s 162nd Wing. But it’s the adjacent flags of coalition-partners – from the pacific island-nat...
 
 

Military life: Separated, but not alone

  MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho — As the dawn broke out over the mountains, I woke up to the sun peeping through my window. Once I got up I went straight to the kitchen to make my family breakfast yet in the back of my mind, all I could think about is how am I...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>