Commentary

December 12, 2013

Detached supervision breeds average performance

Commentary by Master Sgt. Antonio Lindley
99th Logistics Readiness Squadron

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev.  – Growing up as a child, I got in trouble for getting a “C” grade for my school work and it reflected on my report card.

My mother, actively involved in my childhood development, instilled an ethos: “There is an enemy called average; you are not average and an average score isn’t acceptable.”

Some of my friends had “detached parents.” Some detached parents may work a lot, avoid parent-child development and generally may not be involved in their child’s upbringing. Some tend to send their child to their room to watch television or play video games.

Some children of detached parents got in trouble at school and A and B grades rarely reflected on their report cards.

In retrospect, most of these childhood friends are in jail, just got out of jail or doing nothing significant with their life.

To avert this situation, it is vitally important for a parent to proactively interact with their children to mold and shape success, but this can also be applied to supervisor and subordinate relationships.

When I joined the military I saw a similar “detached parent” situation, but instead of seeing it in my mother or father, I saw it in a supervisor.

I was new to the Air Force and didn’t know what to expect. Much like a “detached parent,” my supervisor never got involved and provided no guidance. I simply did my job and went home.

I accomplished everything asked of me. In my eyes, I was an outstanding Airman. Then, all of a sudden, my enlisted performance report was due. I didn’t know what an EPR was. I didn’t even know I was graded for my performance and never had a mid-term feedback.

My very first EPR was a four.

I learned from my first supervisor what not to do, and this bad experience catapulted my life into excellence. I used the experiences of my parent-childhood upbringing, with the help of a great supervisor, who would constantly remind me, “When excellence is the standard, good isn’t good enough.”

This supervisor led by example and instilled good work ethics. She said when you walk past a problem, you set a new standard. As she would say, “Never walk past a problem, face it head on, and come up with a solution.”

In one instance, she pointed out that when you see trash on the ground, pick it up and throw it in the trash. If you walk passed the trash, you set a new standard. As time passes, other people will walk past it and more trash will accumulate. If you know a better way of resolving a problem, use your expertise to help solve the problem.

It only takes one good, interactive supervisor to know the importance of communicating with subordinates and explaining expectations to better an Airman. As a leader, set your standards high and insist your people measure up. This is also stated in the professional development guide.

Neglecting performance feedback is detrimental, just like the parent not communicating with the child who does not succeed in life. Supervisors play a vital role in the success of Airmen — avoid becoming the “detached supervisor.”

Airmen may succeed without you, and learn from your bad supervision, but strive for excellence and set up your Airmen for success.

I’m always striving to improve and become a better Senior NCO and actively play a role in the success of Airmen. As mom stated — average isn’t going to cut it and I continue to pass that along to my troops.

After my first EPR, all my remaining EPR’s have been a five. In my professional development, my college cumulative GPA is a 3.8.

Like my supervisor emphasized, excellence is the standard. Doing your job and going home isn’t enough. Be the difference you want to see in the world. You are a part of something bigger than yourself, so set the example and be involved, because someone is always watching.

As a part of the United States Air Force, stand strong and live up to the challenge. Excellence in all we do!




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

SAPR: More than just an Air Force acronym

As an Airman and a senior leader in the Air Force Reserve, I’ve seen firsthand the devastating impacts of sexual assault on an Air Force organization. Regardless of your unit or military status, Active or Reserve, no one is immune to these impacts nor absolved of their responsibility to combat the instances of sexual assault...
 
 

ACC, PACAF commanders confirmed

WASHINGTON (AFNS) — Pacific Air Forces Commander Gen. Herbert Carlisle will be the next commander of Air Combat Command and ACC Vice Commander Lt. Gen. Lori Robinson will be the next commander of Pacific Air Forces, according to a Senate confirmation vote July 23. Headquartered at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, ACC leads America’s Combat Air...
 
 
Flooding_pict

Flooding still underway this year, avoid water runoff problems

While rain in a desert climate is usually welcome, too much of a good thing can a problem for travelers, especially newcomers who may not be familiar with how quickly driving and other travel conditions can change. “There hav...
 

 

Cyber Airmen create virtual help desk

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO – LACKLAND, Texas (AFNS) — The Air Force Enterprise Service Desk is going virtual, and Joint Base San Antonio – Lackland will be the first to see it as it rolls out across the Air Force, starting the end of August. Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Welsh has challenged...
 
 

AFSOUTH strengthens space ties with partner nations

Three officers from the Dominican Republic, Peruvian and Brazilian militaries partnered with active-duty and guard Airmen at Davis-Monthan for a rare opportunity to work collectively on the space component of PANAMAX 2014, Aug. 8-15. For a third year, partner nation participants took part in the space element of PANAMAX, an annual U.S. Southern Command sponsored...
 
 

The Judge Advocate General’s Corps announces law school programs

PATRICK AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. (AFNS) — Officers interested in continuing to serve the Air Force as a judge advocate are able to apply to the Funded Legal Education Program, or FLEP, and the Excess Leave Program, ELP. Officers selected for FLEP have the opportunity to attend law school at the Air Force’s expense while...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin