Air Force

January 30, 2014

Little Blue Book: Pocket-sized guide of Air Force values, regulations

Master Sgt. Jason Hill
Headquarters Air Force Reserves Squadron first sergeant

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, Texas – There are some who are familiar with Air Force Instruction 1-1, “The Little Blue Book.” Those who have been in the Air Force some 20-30 years may have even seen it. However, most people may not have any idea what prompted the Air Force Chief of Staff to launch this initiative.

In 1983, the Air Force published Air Force Regulation 30-1, Air Force Standards. Referred to as “The Little Blue Book,” widely distributed throughout the Air Force and small enough to carry around in the uniform pocket, it was used by commanders to enforce standards.

During the early 90s, the Air Force made the transition from regulations to instructions, resulting in AFR 30-1 becoming obsolete.

A recent scrub of all AFIs in preparation of the repeal of the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy revealed that no current AFI addressed ‘public display of affection.’

After some research, it was discovered the PDA prohibition existed in AFR 30-1, but was never incorporated into any other AFI. This reminded the Air Force of the previous use of AFR 30-1, which brought about a revision of “The Little Blue Book.”

This new AFI models the older AFR, but it also addresses contemporary issues. These issues include: use of social media, Wingman concept, resiliency, Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program, joint ethics regulation, religion and government neutrality and tattoos and body piercings.

The CSAF, who felt it was important Airmen understood the content of this AFI, approved it as it represented Air Force leadership.

To emphasize this point, a new AF publication series was created called Series 1. AFI 1-1 is the only instruction in that new series.

The AFI consolidates the various standards of conduct.

Although it is a guide for all Airmen, it is designed to be a tool for first-line supervisors, assisting them in addressing issues with subordinates. It can also be used in feedback sessions or counseling sessions to address what is expected of Airmen.

If you don’t have a “Little Blue Book” of your own, contact any first sergeant and we will ensure that you receive one.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
(U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Chris Massey)

9/11 Tower Challenge held at UofA

The Never Forgotten 9/11 Tower Challenge was held at the University of Arizona Football Stadium on Sept. 11. Approximately 350 participants, including personnel from D-M, attempted the challenge of climbing 2,071 stairs. This f...
 
 

Core elements work together

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. — The Air Force has built a suicide prevention program based on 11 overlapping core elements that stress community involvement and leadership in the prevention of suicides in the military: Leadership involvement — Air Force leaders actively support the entire spectrum of suicide prevention initiatives in the community. Addressing suicide...
 
 

Keep sports safe

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. — Playing sports is fun and it helps people keep in shape and relieve stress. However, if one is not careful, playing sports can result in injuries that keep Airmen on the sideline and out of work. “The main cause of sports-related injuries is over aggressive play and people going...
 

 
DoD

Ice bucket challenge – What does DOD say?

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. — If you have been following social media lately, you’ve seen the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge all over your newsfeed and Instagram. This has become an internet phenomenon in which people get doused with ice water to raise money to combat Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease....
 
 

Air Force Enlisted Village: Not just a place to live, a place to call home

I first visited the Air Force Enlisted Village as a young first sergeant in 2009, when I was stationed at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. I went to visit with the Tyndall Active Airmen’s Association, Tyndall’s E-1 to E-4 Professional Association, and was amazed at what I saw. This was also the first time I...
 
 

Advise Airmen of rights before asking questions

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. — Every day supervisors are faced with challenging scenarios and situations that require them to engage in efforts to help their Airmen. When this engagement is due to a negative act such as theft, damage to property or other possible legal violations, we must resist the instinct to question them...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin