Air Force

January 30, 2014

Little Blue Book: Pocket-sized guide of Air Force values, regulations

Master Sgt. Jason Hill
Headquarters Air Force Reserves Squadron first sergeant

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, Texas — There are some who are familiar with Air Force Instruction 1-1, “The Little Blue Book.” Those who have been in the Air Force some 20-30 years may have even seen it. However, most people may not have any idea what prompted the Air Force Chief of Staff to launch this initiative.

In 1983, the Air Force published Air Force Regulation 30-1, Air Force Standards. Referred to as “The Little Blue Book,” widely distributed throughout the Air Force and small enough to carry around in the uniform pocket, it was used by commanders to enforce standards.

During the early 90s, the Air Force made the transition from regulations to instructions, resulting in AFR 30-1 becoming obsolete.

A recent scrub of all AFIs in preparation of the repeal of the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy revealed that no current AFI addressed ‘public display of affection.’

After some research, it was discovered the PDA prohibition existed in AFR 30-1, but was never incorporated into any other AFI. This reminded the Air Force of the previous use of AFR 30-1, which brought about a revision of “The Little Blue Book.”

This new AFI models the older AFR, but it also addresses contemporary issues. These issues include: use of social media, Wingman concept, resiliency, Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program, joint ethics regulation, religion and government neutrality and tattoos and body piercings.

The CSAF, who felt it was important Airmen understood the content of this AFI, approved it as it represented Air Force leadership.

To emphasize this point, a new AF publication series was created called Series 1. AFI 1-1 is the only instruction in that new series.

The AFI consolidates the various standards of conduct.

Although it is a guide for all Airmen, it is designed to be a tool for first-line supervisors, assisting them in addressing issues with subordinates. It can also be used in feedback sessions or counseling sessions to address what is expected of Airmen.

If you don’t have a “Little Blue Book” of your own, contact any first sergeant and we will ensure that you receive one.




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