Air Force

February 13, 2014

Experienced Airmen wanted: Continue your career in the Reserve

Master Sgt. Shawn J. Jones
Air Force Reserve Command Recruiting Service

ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga.  — Force management programs will push thousands of active-duty Airmen out of their jobs, but opportunities exist in the Air Force Reserve for Airmen who don’t want to hang-up their uniforms for good.

“Force management will cost many Airmen their jobs, but not necessarily their careers,” said Col. Steve Fulaytar, the Air Force Reserve’s director of recruiting. “They can continue their service as Citizen Airmen.”

Reserve service provides a benefits package highlighted by programs familiar to most Airmen such as tuition assistance, the Post 9-11 G.I. Bill and the opportunity to work toward a military retirement plan. Additionally, low-cost healthcare insurance is available to most reservists at significantly lower rates than comparable plans, and enlistment bonuses are available for some career fields at specific duty locations.

Airmen transitioning into the Reserve stand to receive many benefits, but they also provide plenty of benefits themselves. New Citizen Airmen who have active-duty experience are valuable to Reserve units because they are mission-ready.

“When an active-duty Airman decides to continue their career in the Reserve, everyone wins,” Col. Fulaytar said. “The Airman retains the benefits of continued service, the Reserve gains an Airman who can contribute immediately and the regular Air Force has one less Airman that must be involuntarily separated.”

One key difference between active and Reserve service is that Citizen Airmen won’t have to relocate to suit the needs of the Air Force. Many reservists spend the majority of their career with one unit and only agree to a permanent change of station when the timing is right for them.

Airmen who are ready to separate don’t have to wait until their original enlistment or commission obligation is complete. The Palace Chase program enables Airmen to separate from their active enlistment or commission as long as they continue their service with the Reserve Component.

Airmen should be aware the recruiting process is somewhat different from when they joined the active-duty Air Force. Once Airmen are deemed eligible for Reserve service, they must work with an in-service recruiter to locate a duty location and position that meet their needs.

“Our Reserve units love fully qualified Airmen who can hit the ground running,” Fulaytar said. “But finding duty positions for new recruits takes time, so they can help themselves by contacting their in-service recruiter as soon as possible.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Courtesy photo

Extraordinary effort regardless of outcome

DAVIS-MONTHAN AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. — Imagine a 5-year-old boy chasing grasshoppers at a camp site. He wanders too far. Darkness falls, and he is lost. A storm is brewing in the sky above, and the camping party turns into...
 
 
U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Chris Drzazgowski

D-M conducts Meet and Greet at local high school

TUCSON, Ariz. — A community event was held at Rincon High School Wednesday. The Meet and Greet event allowed members of the Tucson community to interact with their neighboring Airmen and learn about the mission of Davis...
 
 
U.S. Air Force photo/Mike Kaplan

Tuskegee Airman takes final flight at Academy

U.S. AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Colo. (AFNS) — (This feature is part of the “Through Airmen’s Eyes” series. These stories focus on individual Airmen, highlighting their Air Force story.) Franklin Macon’s f...
 

 
DoD
Courtesy photo by Tim Brumbeloe

‘I Will Wait’ Tells Stories of Generations of Military Spouses

WASHINGTON — America sends its sons and daughters to war, and a new play titled “I Will Wait” looks at the effect of these deployments across the generations. The brainchild of Amy Uptgraft, the play connects the experien...
 
 
U.S. Air Force graphic/ Tech. Sgt. Ryan Crane

F-22 inaugural deployment to Europe

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany  — Four F-22 Raptors, one C-17 Globemaster III, and approximately 60 Airmen arrived at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, to train with allied air forces and U.S. services through mid-Septembe...
 
 
CAP_pict

Civil Air Patrol joins total force ‘Airmen’

WASHINGTON (AFNS) — When conducting missions for the Air Force as the official Air Force auxiliary, the Civil Air Patrol is now included in the Air Force’s definition of the total force. CAP has provided 74 years of sup...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>