World

April 10, 2014

Arizona’s F-16 schoolhouse builds capable partners, strong bonds

Desert wing is the international hub for fighter pilot training

Tags:
Maj. Gabe Johnson
Arizona National Guard Public Affairs
(U.S. Air Force photo/ Master Sgt. Jack Braden)
Three Arizona Air National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcons soar over the Arizona desert during a training mission. Guardsmen based at Tucson International Airport carry out a full-time mission to train U.S. and partner-nation fighter pilots.

Over European castles, Middle Eastern deserts and Pacific islands, F-16 fighter pilots are soaring in ever-increasing numbers.

Their experiences, nationalities and cultures are different, but they share several common bonds. They are partners, they are friends and they learned to fly their F-16s at the Air National Guard base at Tucson International Airport.

With more nations adding the F-16 to their inventories, the need for pilot training increases, and air force pilots from all over the world are traveling to the 162nd Wing to learn to fly the multipurpose fighter.

“Our primary goal for international pilot training is to build a foundation that will enable us all to carry out operations as coalition partners,” said Col. Phil Purcell, wing commander. “And this wing has the people, equipment and experience to do just that.”

Roughly 1,450 Arizona Air Guardsmen here maintain and operate 64 F-16s for the purpose of training aspiring fighter pilots from the United States and current partners Singapore, Poland, Norway, Japan, Iraq and the Netherlands.

“Over the last 25 years, the wing has trained more than 2,000 graduates from 28 nations. It’s a mission we know very well,” said Purcell. As senior leaders often point out, enhancing the air capabilities of other nations is an undertaking of the utmost significance in the current world environment, he said.

From the highest levels of the Department of Defense, leaders are directing efforts to develop the air forces of partner nations.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel emphasized the importance of international training during a lecture at the Center for Strategic Studies Global Security Forum, Nov. 5, 2013, in Washington D.C.

“In the face of reduced defense budgets and new challenges, our defense institutions must be reshaped to assure our military’s continuing capacity, capability, and readiness. That includes a continued focus on capacity-building for our allies and partners, and working closely with them and through alliances.” he said.

To advance the initiative, the 162nd Wing trains more than 70 international student pilots per year, offering several training programs that range from initial F-16 training to qualify new pilots to an advanced weapons course.

The syllabus each country follows is tailored to meet the specific needs of each air force. Some require more air-to-ground training, some are air-to-air focused and some want both – and they may add flight lead upgrade training or instructor qualification for certain students.

The initial training course, for example, is six-to-eight months in duration and carries the largest number of students.

“By the time an initial student pilot arrives in Tucson, he already has his pilot wings and he’s graduated from the Defense Language Institute for language training so we can be sure he knows how to fly and how to communicate in English,” said Col. Jeff Butler, an instructor pilot and the unit’s operations group commander. “Our job is to start the student out in the F-16 from square one.”

Butler attributes the wing’s training success to several factors.

“First and foremost, the 162nd has an unparalleled safety record because our maintenance personnel here average 18 years of experience specializing on the F-16,” said the colonel. “That instills confidence in the nations we train.”

Adding to the secure feeling of flying aircraft from one of the safest F-16 fleets in the world is the freedom afforded by Arizona’s plentiful ranges.

“We consider our ranges to be national treasures. There are very few places in the world with this kind of airspace for military training,” Butler said.

The Barry Goldwater Range in southwest Arizona consists of 2.7 million acres of relatively undisturbed Sonoran Desert. Overhead are 57,000 cubic miles of airspace where fighter pilots can practice air-to-air maneuvers and engage simulated battlefield targets on the ground.

“Finally, we average 17,000 flying hours per year, and we’re able to do that because of Arizona’s year-round flying weather. Less than 3 percent of scheduled sorties here are canceled due to weather… that’s practically unheard of in other parts of the world,” he said.

All of these elements add up to optimal flight-training conditions which allow the wing’s cadre of 80 instructor pilots to execute an aggressive training schedule.

“The students get the best possible flight education when they come here,” said Colonel Purcell. “Our pilots average 10 years of instructor time and 2,400 flying hours in the F-16.”

Airmen here take great pride in their mission, said Purcell, and they see the big picture.

“On its most basic level, it’s about flying together, operating together and training together, so if we have to, we can fight together. On a deeper level, it’s about friendships. With more than 4,000 F-16s in operation around the world, creating the foundation of a relationship is absolutely invaluable,” he said.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
DoD

DoD takes steps to aid absentee voters

WASHINGTON – As the Nov. 4 midterm election nears, Defense Department officials are taking steps to ensure absentee voting is even easier for service members, their families and overseas citizens via FVAP.gov. In coordination with the military services and State Department, Absentee Voting Week begins today, aiming to raise awareness and remind voters of important...
 
 

New EPR challenges status quo

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. – The enlisted performance report is going to drastically change. These changes seek to combat inflated ratings, which have been a prevalent complaint from Airmen over the years. The change is right around the corner and many Airmen are asking themselves, “How will it affect future promotions, and what can I do...
 
 

55th Rescue Squadron returns home

(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Camilla Elizeu) U.S. Air Force Maj. Stephanie Harley, 355th Aerospace Medicine Squadron Bio Engineering Flight commander, and son welcome home Capt. Colin Harley, 55th Rescue Squadron HH-60 Pavehawk pilot, at Davis-Monthan, Oct. 11. Capt. Harley has just returned from a five-month deployment to Afghanistan.
 

 

AF to implement TDY policy changes

JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM, Hawaii (AFNS) — Recently, the Air Force started implementing two temporary duty policy changes that will impact travel reimbursements for Airmen. The first change, which took effect Oct. 1, made changes to the Joint Travel Regulations, Reimbursable and Incidental Expense Policy. The second will be a change in long-term TDY per...
 
 

OPSEC: Everyone’s responsibility

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. – Everyone who’s been around the military has heard the term Operations Security, or OPSEC, but do they really know what it means? Many people think OPSEC is all about classified information, when the opposite is true; OPSEC targets critical and sensitive unclassified information. OPSEC is a fundamental principle of the Air...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin