U.S.

April 24, 2014

Prior Service program open but strictly limited

Tech. Sgt. Hillary Stonemetz
Air Force Recruiting Service Public Affairs

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, Texas — A very limited number of specialized careers are open in the Air Force Prior Service Program.

The prior service program is an enlistment option which allows a select number of people who separated from military active duty, the Guard or Reserve, to enter full-time Air Force service. The number of applicants being accepted for fiscal 2014 has dropped from 250 to 50.

“The goal number for the prior service program is based on the needs of the Air Force,” said Angelo Haygood, Air Force Recruiting Service deputy division chief of operations. “It is reviewed by Air Staff A1 at least once annually.”

Headquarters Air Force in Washington D.C., determines prior service requirements by examining career manning and determining the need for experienced people.

“Currently, we are only accepting applications for the Direct Duty and Retraining categories,” said Tech. Sgt. Todd Benson, AFRS enlisted accessions program manager.

“Direct Duty means applicants can enter active duty without going to technical school,” he said. “This category is for applicants who held that particular Air Force Specialty Code previously or those who currently hold the AFSC in the National Guard or Reserve. It’s also open to applicants from sister services who were trained at a joint technical school because all service branches receive the same training.”

“Retraining is open to applicants from any AFSC who want to become Battlefield Airmen,” he added.

The career fields currently being accepted for Direct Duty are:

1A8X1, airborne cryptologic linguist

1B4X1, cyberspace defense

1C2X1, combat control

1C4X1, tactical air control party

1N4X1A, network intelligence analyst

1T0X1, survival, evasion, resistance, and escape

1T2X1, pararescue

1W0X2, special operations weather

3E8X1, explosive ordnance disposal

8D0X0, Linguist and Cultural Advisor

Skill certification for EOD expires after two years, so applicants who held that AFSC more than two years ago will have to process under the Retraining category, Benson said.

Linguist and Cultural Advisor is part of the Military Accessions Vital to the National Interest program and is open to legal, non-immigrant alien applicants to teach foreign languages at Department of Defense schools. The career field is only open for specific languages.

The career fields currently being accepted for Retraining in fiscal 2015 are: combat control, pararescue, tactical air control party, and special operations weather. Applicants will also have to pass all applicable components of the Physical Ability and Stamina Test. Retraining for fiscal 2014 is limited to pararescue.

“The processing time for Direct Duty applicants varies, but on average it can take from four to six months,” Benson said. “Retraining applicants may have to wait up to a year for a slot to open in a technical school because space is very limited.”

The prior service goal for fiscal 2015 is currently 50 recruits. Prior service officer applications are considered by the Air Force Personnel Center on a case-by-case basis.

For more information, or to apply for Direct Duty or Retraining, talk to your local Air Force recruiter. You will need to provide the recruiter with documents such as: DD Form 214, last five Enlisted Performance Reviews, a letter of recommendation, prior PAST results or DD Form 368 (Release from National Guard duty).

Those who are interested can also go to www.AIRFORCE.com and speak with an Air Force Advisor, or call the 1-800 National Toll Free Call Center at 1-800-423-USAF for information and guidance.




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