Air Force

March 4, 2016
 

CV-22 Osprey

Ultimate Archer

The CV-22 Osprey is a tiltrotor aircraft that combines the vertical takeoff, hover and vertical landing qualities of a helicopter with the long-range, fuel efficiency and speed characteristics of a turboprop aircraft. Its mission is to conduct long-range infiltration, exfiltration and resupply missions for special operations forces.

This versatile, self-deployable aircraft offers increased speed and range over other rotary-wing aircraft, enabling Air Force Special Operations Command aircrews to execute long-range special operations missions. The CV-22 can perform missions that normally would require both fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft. The CV-22 takes off vertically and, once airborne, the nacelles (engine and prop-rotor group) on each wing can rotate into a forward position.

The CV-22 is equipped with integrated threat countermeasures, terrain-following radar, forward-looking infrared sensor and other advanced avionics systems that allow it to operate at low altitude in adverse weather conditions and medium- to high-threat environments.

The CV-22 is the Special Operation Forces variant of the U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey. The first two test aircraft were delivered to Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., in September 2000. The 58th Special Operations Wing at Kirtland AFB, N.M., began CV-22 aircrew training with the first two production aircraft in August 2006.

The first operational CV-22 was delivered to Air Force Special Operations Command in January 2007. Initial operational capability was achieved in 2009. A total of 51 CV-22 aircraft are scheduled to be delivered by the end of 2019.

General characteristics
Primary function: special operations forces long-range infiltration, exfiltration and resupply
Power plant: two Rolls Royce-Allison AE1107C turbo shaft engines
Thrust: more than 6,200 shaft horsepower per engine
Wingspan: 84 feet 7 inches (25.8 meters)
Length: 57 feet 4 inches (17.4 meters)
Height: 22 feet 1 inch (6.73 meters)
Rotary diameter: 38 feet (11.6 meters)
Speed: 277 mph (241 knots) (cruising speed)
Ceiling: 25,000 feet (7,620 meters)
Maximum vertical takeoff weight: 52,870 pounds (23,982 kilograms)
Maximum rolling takeoff weight: 60,500 pounds (27,443 kilograms)
Armament: one .50 Cal Machine gun on ramp
Range: combat radius of 500 nautical miles with one internal auxiliary fuel tank
Payload: 24 troops (seated), 32 troops (floor loaded) or 10,000 pounds of cargo
Crew: four (pilot, copilot and two flight engineers)
Builders: Bell Helicopter Textron Inc., Amarillo, Texas; Boeing Company, Defense and Space Group, Helicopter Division, Philadelphia
Deployment date: 2006
Unit cost: $90 million




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