Health & Safety

December 8, 2017
 

When using heaters, beware of carbon monoxide

As the temperature drop here in the Sonoran desert the time has finally arrived to turn on your heaters.

With that there is an increased risk of carbon monoxide being produced in your home.

Carbon monoxide is a byproduct of incomplete combustion and is often called the invisible killer and can have devastating results for you and your family.

The Davis-Monthan Air Force Base (Ariz.) Fire Emergency Services wants to remind all Desert Lightning Team members that If your CO detector sounds you should move everyone in the household outside to fresh air and call 911 or 520-228-3333 (on base), making sure to let the dispatcher know if anyone is experiencing flu like symptoms.

It is also important to remember to never use the oven to warm the house, only warm vehicles outside, and use barbecue grills outside only.

If you live in housing and are having problems with your detectors contact Soaring Heights Housing Maintenance at 520-748-3334 for repair.

For more information, contact the DM Fire Emergency Services Prevention Division at 520-228-4333.




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