Air Force

December 7, 2012

CSAF directs Air Force-wide inspection

WASHINGTON (AFNS) — Commanders across the Air Force will conduct health and welfare inspections starting Dec. 5 to emphasize an environment of respect, trust and professionalism in the workplace.

The health and welfare inspection is a tool routinely used by unit commanders, command chiefs, and first sergeants.

Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III tasked commanders during the Nov. 28 Wing Commanders Call to examine their work settings and ensure Airmen at all levels consistently apply standards of professionalism and respect across the service.

“Over the past months, I’ve discussed with our commanders, leaders and supervisors about the importance of pride and performance,” said Welsh. “When Airmen work in a setting that is consistent with our core values of integrity, service and excellence, they perform with honor and distinction – they deserve nothing less. Anything short detracts from that pride and cripples mission effectiveness.”

The purpose of this inspection is to reinforce expectations for the workplace environment, correct deficiencies, and deter conditions that may be detrimental to good order and discipline. Commanders will look for and remove unprofessional or inappropriate items that hinder a professional working environment.

“This is about commanders being commanders,” Welsh said. “The underlying principle for the inspection is our core values, and the bottom line is that it’s the right thing to do.”


Air Force photograph by Kenji Thuloweit

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