Commentary

July 20, 2012

Competition: Securing Americans value and efficiency

Tags:
by Jamie Morin
Acting Under Secretary of the Air Force and Chief Management Officer
competition-edit
President Barack Obama has appointed Dr. Jamie Morin as the Acting Under Secretary of the Air Force. He has served as the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for financial management and comptroller.

The White House continues to challenge federal employees to identify areas where we can save scarce taxpayer dollars while improving the way the government works.

President Obama believes the best ideas usually come from the front lines and back in 2009 launched the SAVE Award (Securing Americans Value and Efficiency) to seek ideas from Federal employees about how we can make government more efficient and effective.

Over the past three years, Federal employees have submitted more than 75,000 cost-cutting ideas through the SAVE Award. Dozens of the most promising ideas have been included in the President’s Budget, including some noteworthy Air Force submissions. I thank the many Airmen who participated in prior years and encourage you to take time to consider and submit good ideas this year as well.

Please go to the Office of Management and Budget website (www.whitehouse.gov/save-award) by the 24 July deadline if you would like to submit an idea. You will see award criteria and prior year award winning ideas at the website. You can also encourage your co-workers to vote on your idea or submit their own. The winner gets to come to Washington

to present his or her idea to the President for possible inclusion in the next budget.

Our most valuable resource is our talented and innovative military and civilian workforce. At a time when the nation continues to face fiscal and economic challenges, it’s all the more important that we work together to get the maximum combat capability out of each dollar the taxpayers entrust to us – every good idea matters!

Again, thank you in advance for your participation in this year’s SAVE challenge, and for what each of you do every day to make our Air Force the best in the world.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Just American: A century of Black life

Black History Month, or National African American History Month, is an annual celebration of achievements by black Americans and a time for recognizing the central role of African Americans in U.S. history. The event grew out of “Negro History Week,” the brainchild of noted Harvard-trained historian Carter Woodson. Since 1976, every U.S. president has officially...
 
 

Don’t underestimate the importance of sacrifices

As I was reviewing some enlisted performance reports and decorations today, I started contemplating a huge event in my life that occurred almost 20 years ago. In April of 1995, I asked my then girlfriend Tiffani, a fellow Airman at the time, to be my wife, for better or worse. We were married later that...
 
 

Through our character – an opportunity to reflect on important issues in our community

- What captures your attention?  We look forward to better homes, better jobs, families that don’t fight.  We plan for retirement and hope to live out our days in peace.  But as one person so aptly states, “we plan for happiness, but we’re formed by suffering.”  A foundation that does not give way to the...
 

 
rufit-edit

RUfit? Thriving outside the biodome

Staying fit, sharpening our knowledge about suicide and building resiliency are all hot topics in today’s Air Force. As all of these elements are crucial, resiliency encompasses almost everything that weighs heavy in our ...
 
 

Everyone can be great

A few weeks ago, a football player for the Dallas Cowboys was asked what he’d like from the playoff game home crowd. The player, J.J. Wilcox, responded, “Just be great.” For some reason, that phrase stuck in my mind, and it continued to nag me. Then, I realized why.  One of my foundational beliefs is...
 
 

Through our character – an opportunity to reflect on important issues in our community

- An article in the Atlantic Monthly asked the readers to think about things that lead them astray.  If we put it in religious categories, the things that typically lead us astray are: lust, fear, vanity, gluttony.  They are in the words of the author, “the fulfillment of momentary and passing desires.” Why are we...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>