Health & Safety

August 31, 2012

Escape planning


In 2011, there were an estimated 369,500 reported home structure fires and 2,640 associated civilian deaths in the United States:

 

  • Only one-fifth to one-fourth of households (23%) have actually developed and practiced a home fire escape plan to ensure they could escape quickly and safely.
  • One-third of American households who made an estimate thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life-threatening. The time available is often less. And only 8% said their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out!

 

Fire can spread rapidly through your home, leaving you as little as two minutes to escape safely once the alarm sounds. Your ability to get out depends on advance warning from smoke alarms, and advance planning — a home fire escape plan that everyone in your family is familiar with and has practiced. Having an escape plan in the case of an emergency is one of the most important tasks a family can get involved in. Whether your family may be involved with an earthquake, home-fire, or natural disaster, learning how to evacuate your home safely and account for ALL family members is very important. All family members should be involved in creating a safe escape plan and ensure everyone has sufficient knowledge of the plan.

 

The Edwards Fire Department will leave you with some tips that will assist in creating an escape plan that will keep all members safe should an emergency arise.

 

Tips

  • Draw a home escape plan and discuss it with everyone in your household
  • Practice the plan night and day with everyone in your home twice a year
  • Know at least two ways out of every room, if possible. Make sure all doors and windows leading outside open easily
  • Everyone in the household must understand the escape plan
  • Choose an outside meeting place (i.e. neighbor’s house, a light post, mailbox or stop sign), which is a safe distance in from your home where everyone can meet after they’ve escaped
  • Have everyone memorize the emergency phone number of the fire department. That way any member of the household can call from a neighbor’s home or a cellular phone once safely outside
  • If there are infants, older adults, or family members with mobility limitations, make sure that someone is assigned to assist them in the fire drill and in the event of an emergency
  • Practice your home fire escape plan twice a year, making the drill as realistic as possible

If you have any questions regarding this, or any other fire safety issue, just call the Edwards AFB Fire Prevention Branch at (661) 277-3643/3124. Remember; in case of an emergency dial 911 from a duty or housing phone. If you are calling from a cell phone call (661) 277-4540/4541.

 




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