DoD

September 7, 2012

Prevent terrorism

412th TW Aniterrorism Office

As we approach another anniversary of the terror attacks on 9/11, we are reminded of the importance of situational awareness and the need to report suspicious activity to local law enforcement offices and our base security forces.

Much has changed since Sept. 11, 2001, to increase our nation’s security but the threat of a terrorist organization causing harm to the United States has remained a constant.

We must continue to do our part and report activities that are suspicious in nature as soon as we recognize them. The Air Force Eagle Eyes program has identified the following seven areas in which it is imperative to identify and report suspicious activity to help prevent a terrorist attack.

Surveillance: Someone recording or monitoring activities. This may include the use of cameras (either still or video), note taking, drawing diagrams, annotating on maps or using binoculars or other vision-enhancing devices.

Elicitation: People or organizations attempting to gain information about military operations, capabilities, or people. Elicitation attempts may be made by mail, fax, telephone, or in person. Examples could include being approached at a gas station (or mall or airport or library, etc.) and asked about what’s happening at the base.
Getting a fax (or an e-mail or a telephone call) asking for troop strength numbers; the number of airplanes on base; deployment procedures; or how a trash-collection truck gets on base. They could also ask the location of the HQ building; how many people live in a dorm; where the commander lives; how many people hang out at the club; which nightclubs/restaurants off base are highly frequented by military; or the workings of the base’s network firewall, etc.

Tests of security: These are attempts to measure reaction times to security breaches or to penetrate physical security barriers or procedures in order to assess strengths and weaknesses. Examples: A person grabs the base fence and shakes it to see how long it takes for police to respond; a driver approaches the front gate (without ID and/or car sticker) and pretends to be lost or have taken a wrong term just to learn the procedures of how they are dealt with and how far into the gate he/she can get before being turned around. Another example is a person places a “smoke bomb” near the fence or throws it over the fence to learn how quickly police respond and what effect that has on front-gate operations, etc.

Acquiring supplies: Purchasing or stealing explosives, weapons, ammunition, detonators, timers, etc. Also includes acquiring military uniforms, decals, flight manuals, passes and badges (or the equipment to make such items), or any other controlled items.

Suspicious persons out of place: People who don’t seem to belong in the workplace, neighborhood, business establishment or anywhere else. This can include suspicious border crossings and stowaways aboard ship or people jumping ship in port. This category is hard to define, but the point is that people know what looks right and what doesn’t look right in their neighborhoods, office spaces, commutes, etc., If a person doesn’t seem like he or she belongs, there’s probably a reason for that.

Dry run: Putting people into position and moving them around according to their plan without actually committing the terrorist act. This is especially true when planning a kidnapping, but it can also pertain to bombings. An element of this activity could also include mapping out routes and determining the timing of traffic lights and flow. Take note of people moving around from place to place without any apparent purpose and doing it, perhaps, many times. The appropriate example here is the Sept. 11 hijackers who are now known to have actually flown on those exact flights several times before Sept. 11. Their purpose was to practice getting their people into position, working out arrival times, parking, ticketing, going through security, boarding, etc. By taking note of everything around them, in one sense they were conducting surveillance and testing security, but they were also doing a dry run of the actual activity.

Deploying assets: People and supplies getting into position to commit the act. This is a person’s last chance to alert authorities before the terrorist act occurs. Look for people loading up vehicles with weaponry/explosives and/or parking that vehicle somewhere. People in military uniforms (who don’t look right) approaching an installation or getting into a vehicle; people who seem out of place standing by at a certain location as if waiting for something to happen. One fairly good example of this is the attack on the Khobar Towers in Saudi Arabia. When the explosives-laden truck pulled up to the fence line (which was the “deploying assets” step) the driver jumped out and ran away. That was seen by a spotter on the roof of the dormitory who recognized this as suspicious activity. He then sprinted down stairs and began pounding on doors, rousting people out of bed and getting them out of the building. Because of that, he saved many, many lives. It’s all because he recognized the “deploying assets” element.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

News Briefs April 18, 2014

Commissary The Edwards Commissary will be open 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m., April 20. CCAF graduation The Community College of the Air Force Graduation Ceremony is 2:30-4:30 p.m., May 7 at Club Muroc. The graduation ceremony will honor the October 2013 and the April 2014 CCAF classes and will also recognize enlisted Airmen who have completed their...
 
 

Spring season = Spring clean up at Edwards

Winter is finally over and Spring has arrived! Despite the cold mornings or the blustery winds we have battled, the weather is definitely turning warmer. Just like the things we do every year at home, clearing winter debris blown into our yards or removing dead plants and weeds, at Edwards AFB we have an annual...
 
 

April 14 – Pulse on AF force management

WASHINGTON – New eligibility criteria, application deadlines and status updates are all featured in this force management update, an ongoing effort to bring Airmen the latest, most accurate information concerning the complex and dynamic force management programs. Additional TERA, VSP windows The Air Force will open two new fiscal year 2014 temporary early retirement authority...
 

 

NASA signs agreement with German, Canadian partners to test alternative fuels

NASA has signed separate agreements with the German Aerospace Center and the National Research Council of Canada to conduct a series of joint flight tests to study the atmospheric effects of emissions from jet engines burning alternative fuels. The Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS II) flights are set to begin May...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Bobbi Zapka

X-47B wins Collier Trophy

Northrop Grumman photograph by Alan Radecki The two X-47B test aircraft pause between flight test events at Edwards AFB, Calif. The two vehicles were built by Northrop Grumman in Palmdale, Calif., and performed all of their ini...
 
 

Hazardous waste roundup slated for April 26

Edwards AFB Environmental Management is hosting a Household Hazardous and Universal Waste Roundup on Saturday, April 26. The roundup is at the Base Housing Office, 402 West Forbes Ave., Bldg. 6696, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Base housing and dormitory residents can drive up and drop off household hazardous and universal waste for free....
 




One Comment


  1. [...] Desert Wings 1 min ago by in Edwards AFB. You can follow any responses to this entry through the | RSS feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site. [...]



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>