DoD

September 7, 2012

Prevent terrorism

412th TW Aniterrorism Office

As we approach another anniversary of the terror attacks on 9/11, we are reminded of the importance of situational awareness and the need to report suspicious activity to local law enforcement offices and our base security forces.

Much has changed since Sept. 11, 2001, to increase our nation’s security but the threat of a terrorist organization causing harm to the United States has remained a constant.

We must continue to do our part and report activities that are suspicious in nature as soon as we recognize them. The Air Force Eagle Eyes program has identified the following seven areas in which it is imperative to identify and report suspicious activity to help prevent a terrorist attack.

Surveillance: Someone recording or monitoring activities. This may include the use of cameras (either still or video), note taking, drawing diagrams, annotating on maps or using binoculars or other vision-enhancing devices.

Elicitation: People or organizations attempting to gain information about military operations, capabilities, or people. Elicitation attempts may be made by mail, fax, telephone, or in person. Examples could include being approached at a gas station (or mall or airport or library, etc.) and asked about what’s happening at the base.
Getting a fax (or an e-mail or a telephone call) asking for troop strength numbers; the number of airplanes on base; deployment procedures; or how a trash-collection truck gets on base. They could also ask the location of the HQ building; how many people live in a dorm; where the commander lives; how many people hang out at the club; which nightclubs/restaurants off base are highly frequented by military; or the workings of the base’s network firewall, etc.

Tests of security: These are attempts to measure reaction times to security breaches or to penetrate physical security barriers or procedures in order to assess strengths and weaknesses. Examples: A person grabs the base fence and shakes it to see how long it takes for police to respond; a driver approaches the front gate (without ID and/or car sticker) and pretends to be lost or have taken a wrong term just to learn the procedures of how they are dealt with and how far into the gate he/she can get before being turned around. Another example is a person places a “smoke bomb” near the fence or throws it over the fence to learn how quickly police respond and what effect that has on front-gate operations, etc.

Acquiring supplies: Purchasing or stealing explosives, weapons, ammunition, detonators, timers, etc. Also includes acquiring military uniforms, decals, flight manuals, passes and badges (or the equipment to make such items), or any other controlled items.

Suspicious persons out of place: People who don’t seem to belong in the workplace, neighborhood, business establishment or anywhere else. This can include suspicious border crossings and stowaways aboard ship or people jumping ship in port. This category is hard to define, but the point is that people know what looks right and what doesn’t look right in their neighborhoods, office spaces, commutes, etc., If a person doesn’t seem like he or she belongs, there’s probably a reason for that.

Dry run: Putting people into position and moving them around according to their plan without actually committing the terrorist act. This is especially true when planning a kidnapping, but it can also pertain to bombings. An element of this activity could also include mapping out routes and determining the timing of traffic lights and flow. Take note of people moving around from place to place without any apparent purpose and doing it, perhaps, many times. The appropriate example here is the Sept. 11 hijackers who are now known to have actually flown on those exact flights several times before Sept. 11. Their purpose was to practice getting their people into position, working out arrival times, parking, ticketing, going through security, boarding, etc. By taking note of everything around them, in one sense they were conducting surveillance and testing security, but they were also doing a dry run of the actual activity.

Deploying assets: People and supplies getting into position to commit the act. This is a person’s last chance to alert authorities before the terrorist act occurs. Look for people loading up vehicles with weaponry/explosives and/or parking that vehicle somewhere. People in military uniforms (who don’t look right) approaching an installation or getting into a vehicle; people who seem out of place standing by at a certain location as if waiting for something to happen. One fairly good example of this is the attack on the Khobar Towers in Saudi Arabia. When the explosives-laden truck pulled up to the fence line (which was the “deploying assets” step) the driver jumped out and ran away. That was seen by a spotter on the roof of the dormitory who recognized this as suspicious activity. He then sprinted down stairs and began pounding on doors, rousting people out of bed and getting them out of the building. Because of that, he saved many, many lives. It’s all because he recognized the “deploying assets” element.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

News Briefs September 26, 2014

Varicella vaccine available The 412th Medical Group Immunization Clinic now has the Varicella vaccine available for children 12 months and older who are TRICARE beneficiaries. The clinic is open 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday; and noon-4:30 p.m., Wednesdays. For questions or concerns, call the clinic at 661-277-3427.  Blood drive The next American...
 
 

When leaders earn their keep

It’s no secret that a key to being a good leader, military or otherwise, is taking care of your people. I strongly believe Airmen aren’t able to perform at their peak if their personal lives are in disarray. Whether financial woes, marital issues, illnesses or other troubles, it’s tough to be at your best when...
 
 
road-closure

Road closure in support of new bulk fuel storage construction

Beginning Oct. 6, barriers will be set across the intersection of S. Muroc Dr. and Wolfe Ave., and also across S. Muroc Drive and Sellar Ave. The closure is necessary to install a new eight-inch fuel line across South Muroc. Tr...
 

 
aafes-retirees

Edwards Exchange honors military retirees

To pay tribute to military¬†veterans’ enduring sacrifices, the Edwards Air Force Base Exchange will salute America’s 2.4 million military retirees with “Still Serving” events, a week of special savings a...
 
 
Courtesy photograph

Local NCO honored by Dodgers

Courtesy photograph Tech. Sgt. Robert Sumner, 412th Security Forces Squadron, sits in the Los Angeles Dodgers dugout Aug. 23 before a game against the New York Mets. Sumner was honored as the Veteran of the Game that day. The L...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Jet Fabara

Edwards Abilities Expo Oct. 9

Air Force photograph by Jet Fabara Michael Botte, 412th Communications Squadron Information Technology professional, initiates a call Sept. 22 via a video communication device. The video communication devices are provided throu...
 




One Comment


  1. [...] Desert Wings 1 min ago by in Edwards AFB. You can follow any responses to this entry through the | RSS feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site. [...]



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>